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Louise Glück awarded 2020 Nobel Prize in Literature


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    Louis Gluck

    The American poet Louise Glück – awarded this year’s NobelPrize in Literature – was born 1943 in New York and lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts.
    Apart from her writing she is a professor of English at Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut.
    Glück seeks the universal, and in this she takes inspiration from myths and classical motifs, present in most of her works.
    The voices of Dido, Persephone and Eurydice – the abandoned, the punished, the betrayed – are masks for a self in transformation, as personal as it is universally valid.
    Louise Glück is not only engaged by the errancies and shifting conditions of life, she is also a poet of radical change and rebirth, where the leap forward is made from a deep sense of loss.
    In one of her most lauded collections, The Wild Iris (1992), for which she was awarded the Pulitzer Prize, she describes the miraculous return of life after winter in the poem “Snowdrops”:

    Louise Gluck Weebly com

    You will hear thunder and remember me

    October

    Louise Glück – 1943-

    Is it winter again, is it cold again,
    didn’t Frank just slip on the ice,
    didn’t he heal, weren’t the spring seeds planted

    didn’t the night end,
    didn’t the melting ice
    flood the narrow gutters

    wasn’t my body
    rescued, wasn’t it safe

    didn’t the scar form, invisible
    above the injury

    terror and cold,
    didn’t they just end, wasn’t the back garden
    harrowed and planted—

    I remember how the earth felt, red and dense,
    in stiff rows, weren’t the seeds planted,
    didn’t vines climb the south wall

    I can’t hear your voice
    for the wind’s cries, whistling over the bare ground

    I no longer care
    what sound it makes

    when was I silenced, when did it first seem
    pointless to describe that sound

    what it sounds like can’t change what it is—

    didn’t the night end, wasn’t the earth
    safe when it was planted

    didn’t we plant the seeds,
    weren’t we necessary to the earth,

    the vines, were they harvested?

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