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A Most Wanted Man, P.S. Hoffman’s Last Film & John Le Carre

November 24th, 2019
  • (Philip Seymour Hoffman with German cast)
    A Most Wanted Man – Peter Bradshaw

    Philip Seymour Hoffman’s superb swansong


  • (Photo of John Le Carre by Lord Snowdon)

    John Le Carre on Philip Seymour Hoffman

    John Le Carre explains the novel – A Most Wanted Man


  • (Willem Dafoe played the banker)

  • Camus’ Birthday Celebration with Viggo Mortensen – 2019

    November 7th, 2019

  • Reda Kateb and Viggo Mortensen from Far from Men

    David Oelhoffen’s latest film, Far From Men, is based on Albert Camus’ short story “The Guest.” Set during the Algerian War and shot in the manner of a Western, the film features a French and Arabic-speaking Viggo Mortensen as Daru, a schoolteacher in remote Algeria required, against his will, to transport murderous prisoner Mohamed (Reda Kateb) to meet his justice. The two men must confront their own morality and each other against a backdrop of the Atlas Mountains.

    Reda Kateb describes him as “like an actor-citizen in his sense of responsibility”.
    That kind of immersion means that his roles, especially if they are physically or emotionally gruelling, become part of his life. His last spoken-word album, Under the Weather, was dedicated to Albert Camus, whom he greatly admires for taking a principled stance against Stalin even though it cost him his closest friendships on the French left. “He suffered during his lifetime by being honest, by being true to himself, by staying in the moment,” says Mortensen reverently.(Mortensen on Camus via )

  • Viggo Mortensen, Camus Again

    Reading

    Alajbegovic was at Columbia to meet the actor Viggo Mortensen, who, that evening, was to reënact a lecture that Camus had given at the university during his trip, on no less a topic than “The Crisis of Humankind.” Camus’s daughter, Catherine, who also lives in Lourmarin, had sensed something in Mortensen’s pensive performance in a film adaptation of her father’s short story “The Guest.” Alajbegovic had reached out to Mortensen—“I just threw my bottle at Viggo’s sea,” he said—and a week later had a response in the affirmative.

    After the talk, which he delivered before an enchanted crowd, Mortensen suddenly realized he had to get going. As part of his attire for the evening, he’d left off an article of clothing that he holds dear—his Bernie Sanders watch.

    Marie Laforêt (5 October 1939 – 2 November 2019)

    November 3rd, 2019
  • Marie Laforêt (wiki)
    Marie Laforêt est morte (Obit from Le Monde)

  • Kaoru Yachigusa – (January 6, 1931 – October 24, 2019)

    October 28th, 2019

    Kaoru Yachigusa passed away

    Kaoru Yachigusa, actress in “Samurai, The Legend of Musashi,” dies


    (Yachigusa Kaoru and Toshiro Mifune in Samurai, The Legend of Musashi”)

    She was a member of Takarazuka Revue

    Yachigusa, who started her career in the all-women Takarazuka Revue, gained popularity through her role as Otsu in the 1954 film, known as “Miyamoto Musashi” in Japan, which featured Toshiro Mifune as the swordsman Musashi. The film won the Honorary Foreign Language Film Award at the Oscars in 1956.
    She appeared in a number of other films, including Japanese-Italian musical “Madame Butterfly” and “Yukiguni.”


  • (Mariko Kaga and Kaoru Yachigusa in With Beauty and Sorrow based on Kawabata Yasunari. )

    Kaoru Yachigusa was in “Yukiguni” with Kishi Keiko see previous post on Kawabata Yasunari

  • Citizen X, 3 Identical Strangers, Elena – 3 Films for Halloween

    October 27th, 2019
  • Citizen X

    Citizen X is a 1995[1] American television film which covers the efforts of detectives in the Soviet Union to capture an unknown serial killer of women and children in the 1980s, and the successive bureaucratic obstacles they consistently encounter. The film is based upon the true story of Soviet serial killer Andrei Chikatilo, who was convicted in 1992 of the murder of 52 women and children committed between 1978 and 1990. It stars Stephen Rea, Donald Sutherland, and Max Von Sydow.

  • Three Identical Strangers (Five things you may not know)

    3 Identical Strangers (wiki)

    Three Identical Strangers is a 2018 documentary film directed by Tim Wardle and starring Edward Galland, David Kellman, and Robert Shafran. It examines a set of American identical triplets, born in 1961 and adopted as six-month-old infants by separate families, unaware that each child had brothers. The separations were done as part of an undisclosed scientific “nature versus nurture” twin study, to track the development of genetically identical siblings raised in differing circumstances. Combining archival footage, re-enacted scenes, and present-day interviews, the documentary reveals how the brothers discovered one another at age 19 and thereafter sought to understand the circumstances of their separation.[3][4]

    The film premiered at the 2018 Sundance Film Festival,[5] where it won the U.S. Documentary Special Jury Award for Storytelling.[6] The film was a nominee in the Best Documentary category at the 72nd British Academy Film Awards. It was also on the shortlist of 15 films considered for the Academy Award for Best Documentary Feature, out of 166 candidates

  • Elena

    Elena (With Philip Glass soundtrack)

    It premiered in the Un Certain Regard section at the 2011 Cannes Film Festival[1][2] where it won the Special Jury Prize.

    Peter Bradshaw review
    (The above review was written earlier. Since then Andrey Zvyagintsev directed Leviathan.)

    The Silence of the Sea – Jean Pierre Melville

    October 19th, 2019

  • photo via
    The 10 greatest films of Jean Pierre Melville

    “La Silence de la Mer” (1949)
    This debut feature is a distant relative to the atmospheric crime films that would ultimately carve his name among the greats, yet even so, “La Silence de la Mer” is vital in any conversation about Melville. It’s a film that relies so heavily on narration, and is so spatially limited (taking place mostly in a single living room), that it should revokes its right to be cinematic but ends up being so regardless.

    The Complete Melville at Criterion


  • photo via

    Born Jean-Pierre Grumbach
    20 October 1917

  • “Léon Morin, Priest” in English — was Melville’s sixth feature and almost the exact midpoint between early successes like “Bob le Flambeur” (1956), about a gentleman thief organizing the heist of a lifetime, and “Army of Shadows” (1969), his late-career masterpiece about the Resistance. Given his interest in the war, it’s understandable that he was drawn to “Léon Morin” and its story of life during the occupation.

  • Le Samurai

    RIP Robert Forster – He was Cool & Lovely

    October 12th, 2019

  • (Medium Cool Forster, directed by Haskell Wexler)
    Robert Forster

    photo via

  • His top 10 performances
    (Forster played George Clooney’s father-in-law in the Descendants directed by Alexander Payne.
    Also in the list is his part in Mullholland Drive directed by David Lynch)

  • Peter Handke , the Nobel Win & the Goalkeeper’s Fear of the Penalty Kick

    October 10th, 2019

  • (Peter Handke Moravia Night)

    (Peter Handke google image gallery)

  • A Troubling Choice, Authors criticise Peter Handke

  • Handke collaborated with director Wim Wenders on a film version of The Goalkeeper’s Fear of the Penalty, wrote the script for Wenders’ The Wrong Move, and co-wrote the screenplay for Wenders’ Wings of Desire and The Beautiful Days of Aranjuez. He has also directed films, including from his own novels, The Left-Handed Woman and The Absence. (wiki)

    Mario Vargas Llosa and Peter Handke

    Repost from my previous post on Peter Falk below
    Peter Falk is counterweight to Peter Handke?

    Wenders had admired Peter Falk in Cassavetes’ films in the 1970’s, and it was probably from Cassavetes that he obtained Falk’s telephone number. He phoned one evening, introduced himself, told a little about the film and explained that he needed a former angel, to which Peter Falk replied after a pause: “How did you know?” When Falk asked whether a script could be sent, Wenders said that he had nothing at all in writing about this ex-angel, not even a single page. If anything, that apparently made the part even more interesting to Falk, who answered: “Ah, I’ve worked like that before with Cassavetes, and honestly I prefer working without a script.”
    Falk arrived in Berlin one Friday in November and he and Wenders spent the weekend together, developing the role on the basis of taped improvisations. All of Falk’s scenes were shot the following week, and Falk returned to Los Angeles.

    Peter Falk-les ailes du désir (Wings of Desire)

    Imagine John Lennon being 79 years old

    October 6th, 2019

  • Photo by Marc Riboud

  • Imagine: cinematography by Nestor Almendros

  • Louis Malle, John Lennon, Yoko Ono e Jeanne Moreau, 1971 (AP Photo)


  • Kristin Scott Thomas played aunt Mimi in “Nowhere Boy” ..(directed by artist Sam Taylor Wood)

  • “Never Look Away”, Film from the Director of “The Lives of Others”

    August 26th, 2019
  • (RollingStone review)

    Just nominated for an Academy Award as Best Foreign-Language Film and for the extraordinary cinematography of Caleb Deschanel, Never Look Away concerns itself with love and war and the limitless reach of art.

    It isn’t possible to look away from this imposing film for long. Maybe to check the time―it does run for over three hours―or to block out a harrowing moment, but it has a commanding and sensual beauty that isn’t around much at the moment. Top marks to the cinematographer Caleb Deschanel. And like writer-director Florian Henckel von Donnersmarck’s first film, The Lives of Others, it has something serious it wants to say. (via)


  • Ulrich Mühe played Wiesler.

    Lives of Others

    Wiesler is a fascinating character. His face is a mask, trained by his life to reflect no emotion. Sometimes not even his eyes move. As played in Muehe’s performance of infinite subtlety, he watches Dreyman as a cat awaits a mouse. And he begins to internalize their lives — easy, because he has no life of his own, no lover, no hobby, no distraction from his single-minded job.

    RIP Peter Fonda -(February 23, 1940 – August 16, 2019)

    August 16th, 2019

  • via

  • Rolling Stone obit

    Rolling Stone’s film critic remembers the kindhearted countercultural rebel that came from showbiz royalty and rode off into sunset his way

  • Great tribute to Peter Fonda here
    (Mostly on Ulee’s Gold with many interesting facts about Peter Fonda)


  • Peter Fonda and Jean Seberg in Lilith (Robert Rossen directed starring Warren Beatty, Seberg, Fonda and Gene Hackman)

    Fonda impressed Robert Rossen, who directed the Oscar winner All the King’s Men. He cast Fonda in what would be Rossen’s last movie, Lilith (1964), alongside Warren Beatty, Jean Seberg and Gene Hackman. Fonda’s performance was well reviewed. Rossen signed Fonda to a seven-film contract which was to start with an adaptation of Bang the Drum Slowly[14] but then Rossen passed away.

  • Funny video
    (Dennis Hopper & Peter Fonda On Jack Nicholson’s Part In EASY RIDER)

  • Peter Fonda wiki

    Peter Henry Fonda (February 23, 1940 – August 16, 2019) was an American actor. He was the son of Henry Fonda, younger brother of Jane Fonda, and father of Bridget and Justin Fonda (by first wife, Susan Brewer, stepdaughter of Noah Dietrich). Fonda was a part of the counterculture of the 1960s.[2][3]
    He was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Original Screenplay for Easy Rider (1969), and the Academy Award for Best Actor for Ulee’s Gold (1997). For the latter, he won the Golden Globe Award for Best Actor – Motion Picture Drama. Fonda also won the Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actor – Series, Miniseries or Television Film for The Passion of Ayn Rand (1999).

  • Peter directed The Hired Hand
    (See full film from here )

  • Through his friendships with members of the band Byrds, Fonda visited The Beatles in their rented house in Benedict Canyon in Los Angeles in August 1965. While John Lennon, Ringo Starr, George Harrison, and Fonda were under the influence of LSD, Lennon heard Fonda say, “I know what it’s like to be dead.” Lennon used this phrase as the tag line for his song, “She Said She Said”, which was included on the Revolver (1966) album.[8]

  • Jessica Biel on Peter Fonda

    Jessica Biel is mourning “Easy Rider” star Peter Fonda, who played her father in her first movie.

    Fonda was nominated for an best actor Academy Award for his performance as a beekeeper trying to keep his family together in 1997’s “Ulee’s Gold.” Biel, who was 15 when the film released, played an “angsty teenager with a nose ring.”

  • RIP D. A Pennebaker a Pioneer Documentary Filmmaker

    August 3rd, 2019
  • D.A Pennebaker (Rollingstone obit)

  • (wiki)

    Pennebaker has been described as “arguably the pre-eminent chronicler of Sixties counterculture”

  • See his films by year or alphabetically

  • JLG’s 1 AM to D.A. Pennebaker’s 1 PM – Jean Luc Godard’s unfinished film

  • Much more interesting to me was the film he attempted to make in 1969, tentatively titled 1 AM (or One American Movie). A collaboration with cinema-verite pioneers D. A. Pennabaker and Richard Leacock, the project was abandoned after Godard lost interest during the editing phase but Pennebaker ended up completing his own version of the existing footage which he titled 1 PM (or One Parallel Movie). This is a brief history of the film’s journey from concept to screen.

  • On Don’t Look Back – “What I thought was, this person is trying to generate himself,” Pennebaker told The New York Times in 2016. “He’s trying to figure out who he is and what he wants to do. So I filmed him talking to people and listening to people. When the concerts came, I would only shoot little parts of them. I didn’t want it to be a music film. I wanted it to be a film about a person who was finding out who he was.” (via Rollingstone obit)