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RIP Joyce Pensato – 1941-2019

June 14th, 2019
  • Sad news – RIP Joyce Pensato

    Artforum obit

    From 2018 article – Beer with a painter Joyce Pensato

  • Donald as a Crossdresser 0022(Elgawimmer)
    1999, charcoal and pastel on paper
    10 feet x 14 feet

    From the Head & Other Places0017
    (Elgawimmer)

  • Joyce Pensato homepage


  • Felix Lincoln

  • Belle Époque Intrigue of Jacques Henri Lartigue

    June 13th, 2019
  • Unseen Lartigue

    Unseen photographs by Jacques Henri Lartigue in two exhibitions curated by Paul Smith and Michael Hoppen

  • Wes Anderson and Jacques Henri Lartigue

    Wes Anderson openly acknowledged French photographer Jacques Henri Lartigue1 as a source of creative inspiration.

  • 1abelganceL
    Photo of Abel Gance by Lartigue (A silent film master who filmed Napoleon and Beethoven’s Great Love, among others.).

  • Jacques H. Lartigue

    See more photos by Lartigue here


  • Jean Cocteau and Picasso 1955 – photo by Lartigue

  • Capernaum’s Young Best Actor winner Zain Al Rafeea lives in Norway

    June 11th, 2019

  • (April 2019 – visiting Oslo)

    See a video of Zain with school friends

    “Zain Al was discovered on the street as a refugee in Beirut and ended up as the protagonist in a movie that touched a whole world. Today he studies Norwegian language as a pupil in Hammerfest”

    Second chance in Norway

    From Syrian refugee to Oscar nominee, ‘Capernaum’ star gets second chance at childhood in Norway

    Zain Al Rafaeea

    He also won Best Actor at the 2018 International Antalya Film Festival.[11] The New York Times named his as one of the best performances of 2018, with reporter Wesley Morris writing, “Every once in a while, you leave a movie having seen a performance that mocks all the other acting that came before it”.[6] James Verniere of the Boston Herald described Al Rafeea as “part Oliver Twist, part James Dean”

  • Life has been hard on him – mostly because he is a refugee

    Screen daily

    How Nadine Labaki’s ‘Capernaum’ became a $44m sleeper hit in China

    Remembering Anthony Bourdain when he was Back in Beirut,

    June 9th, 2019
  • How Lebanon transformed Anthony Bourdain

    In 2006, he found himself in a country falling into war—an experience that forever altered how he would understand people, culture, history, and conflict.

    Remembering Anthony Bourdain trips to Beirut

    In 2006, Bourdain and his crew were caught in the crossfire of the 2006 Lebanon war. The crew was planning to shoot an episode of his “No Reservations” show when the war broke out.

    They had to leave Lebanon, but it didn’t stop them from coming back.

  • 1aABwithkids
    (Anthony Bourdain with Palestinian children)
    Previous post Bourdain passed away one year ago

    Federico Garcia Lorca – “As I have not worried to be born, I do not worry to die.”

    June 5th, 2019
  • El Pais

    Dalí and Lorca’s games of seduction

  • “As I have not worried to be born, I do not worry to die.” Federico Garcia Lorca


  • One more clip..


    lorca21 (via)

    The story goes that Federico Garcia Lorca (the pilot here) erroneously believed that the film by Dali and Bunuel Un Chien Andalou (an Andalucian Dog) referred to him, coming from Granada, having recently fallen out with his surrealist friends. This to my mind seems doubly pained paranoia if you have seen the film. And who needed Dali as a friend anyway? (Walt Disney actually).

    Lorca garcialorca born on 5 June 1898

  • Visiting Havana

    Federico Garcia Lorca described his arrival in Havana in the spring of 1930 in exquisitely poetic terms…
    …the smell of palm and cinnamon, the perfumes of the Americas with their roots, the Americas of God. But what is this? Spain, again? Andalusia again? It is the yellow color of Cádiz with a more intense shade, the rose of Sevilla almost red and the green of Granada with a light fish-like phosphorescence.

  • Jonathan Mayhew lorcaJonathan Apocryphal Lorca: Translation, Parody, Kitsch

    One reader of my blog pointed out to me the word APOCRYPHAL is a perfect anagram of HAPPY LORCA. I took this as a sign that my examination of the apocryphal Lorcas of American poetry and poetics was ultimately a felicitous one.

    Lorca’s manuscript discovered

    “I offer myself to be devoured by Spanish peasants,” writes the poet Federico García Lorca in a newly-discovered manuscript of a poem from his portrait of the United States during the Great Depression, Poeta en Nueva York (Poet in New York).

    RIP Tony DeLap, Illusion /Magic, Abstract West Coast Artist

    June 1st, 2019

  • Triple Trouble II

    Photo via

  • Art News obit

    Tony DeLap, Maker of Inventive Abstract Art That Embraced Illusion and Magic, Is Dead at 91

    Tony Delap (Homepage)

    photo via

  • See More at Artsy

  • LA Times Obit

    DeLap rose to prominence in 1964 when an illustration of his work was featured on the cover of Artforum magazine alongside a glowing review by then-Editor-at-large John Coplans. The work, exhibited at San Francisco’s Dilexi Gallery, was a series of two-sided glass boxes with edges that descended inward toward the center.

    By the late 1960s, DeLap was among artists including Billy Al Bengston, Craig Kauffman and Larry Bell who were pioneering what came to be known as the “Finish Fetish,” with an emphasis on clean lines, simple shapes and bright, monochromatic colors.

    “He is apart from and yet entirely amidst the whole trajectory of geometric abstract art in California,” said longtime friend, curator and critic Peter Frank. “He’s not quite a minimalist, he’s not quite a traditional abstract artist, but he relates to all of them and did so early on.”

    As the first art professor to be hired at UC Irvine, DeLap influenced generations of artists including Bruce Nauman, Chris Burden, John McCracken and James Turrell.

    Walt Whitman- When lilacs last in the door-yard bloom‘d

    May 31st, 2019

  • via

  • Julian Schnabel’s Walt Whitman IV

  • Whitman and Boys (Boston Review)

  • Paul Hindemith – Work of the week – When lilacs last in the door-yard bloom‘d

  • The Passing of Mono-ha Artist Nobuo Sekine at 76 -May 18, 2019

    May 18th, 2019
  • Nobuo Sekine
    Artsy Obit

    Nobuo Sekine (1942–2019)
    Conceptual artist Nobuo Sekine—whose ephemeral, site-specific sculptural and installation works were associated with Mono-ha (the School of Things), the postwar Japanese art movement active in the late 1960s to the mid ’70s—died on Monday in Los Angeles. He was seventy-six years old.(Artforum Obit)

    (Historical Photographs)


    (Phase of Nothingness – Cloth and Stones)


  • Nobuo Sekine and his Phase of Nothingness (1969) installed at the Japanese Pavilion, 35th Venice Biennale, 1970. Photo by Yoriko Kushigemachi. © Nobuo Sekine.

  • RIP I M Pei – East- West Center in Manoa

    May 16th, 2019

  • Henry Moore and I M Pei
    RIP I M Pei at 102

    Obit from Phaidon-2019

  • Jefferson Hall, East-West Center, Honolulu, Hawaii This 1963 building was one of a handful commissioned from Pei by the US government, who viewed the East-West Center, in the centre of the Pacific as “a meeting place for the intellectuals of the East and the West,”

    “Chinese-American architect I.M. Pei was tapped to design the core buildings of the new campus on the eastern edge of the university grounds,” Bradley writes. “Pei was already coming into his own as a brilliant architect, after designing a number of buildings in Atlanta, Denver, and was also designing the new L’Enfant Plaza in DC at the time. Of course, the symbolism of having a Chinese-American architect design the buildings of the East-West Center was probably not lost on anybody.”

    The residential blocks were heavily influenced by Le Corbusier’s Unité d’Habitation designs; (Pei was such a Corbu fan he even wore glasses similar to those favoured by the Swiss-French architect). However, the Hawaiian climate allowed Pei a little more freedom, prompting him to include outdoor communal kitchens for Honolulu students, offering them good ventilation, and even better views of the surrounding hills.

    I M Pei best buildings

    Sayonara, the Passing of Int’l Actress Kyo Machiko at 95

    May 14th, 2019

  • (Kyo Machiko in Floating Weeds directed by Ozu Yasujiro)

    Kyodo news obit

    Machiko Kyo, internationally acclaimed Japanese actress, dies at 95

    Kyo Machiko (wiki)

    Kyō continued to act through her 80’s. Her final role was as “Matsuura Shino” in the NHK television drama series Haregi Koko Ichiban in 2000. In 2017 she was presented with an award of merit at the 40th Japanese Academy Awards.[1] After retiring from film, she moved back to Osaka, where she resided until her death.
    Kyō never married, although her romantic relationship with Daiei’s president Masaichi Nagata was well-publicized in her native country.
    Kyō died from heart failure on May 12, 2019. She was 95


    (Kyo Machiko with Marlon and Glenn Ford from the Tea House of the August Moon)

    Her sole role in a non-Japanese film was as the young geisha Lotus Blossom from The Teahouse of the August Moon opposite Marlon Brando and Glenn Ford, for which she received a Golden Globe nomination.

  • 1aKyoUgetsuMizo
    Ugetsu (Kenji Mizoguchi, cinematography by Kazuo Miyagawa)


  • (Rashomon – Kurosawa, cinematography by Miyagawa)


  • (The Face of Another, Kyo Machiko directed by Teshigahara)

  • Street of 1akasenKM Shame
    Kenji Mizoguchi and actresses on the set of his film “Street of Shame (Akasen Chitai)

  • Gary Snyder – Poet of Deep Ecology at 89

    May 7th, 2019

  • Gary Snyder (Photo by Allen Ginsberg )

    Happy birthday Gary Snyder (May 8 1930)

  • “I feel ancient, as though I had
    Lived many lives.
    And may never now know
    If I am a fool
    Or have done what my
    karma demands.”‘ Gary Snyder

  • “Range after range of mountains.
    Year after year after year.
    I am still in love.”
    ― Gary Snyder

    “Clouds sink down the hills
    Coffee is hot again. The dog
    Turns and turns about, stops and sleeps.”
    ― Gary Snyder, Riprap and Cold Mountain Poems

    Reality Insight (poem on youtube)

  • Paris Review Interview here.

  • Poetry foundation

    ”Poetry a riprap on the slick rock of metaphysics”
    “Once Only almost at the equator almost at the
    equinox
    exactly at midnight from a ship the full moon in the center of the sky.”

  • Iain Sinclair meets Gary Snyder (The Man In the Clearing)

  • Snyder on Kerouac

    The dialectic that I observed in Jack, which was kind of charming, really, and you see it at work in his novels, was that be could play the fool and he could play the student very well. “But see, I really don’t know anything about this. Teach me!” “Wow! You really know how to do that?” and lead you on. ‘I’hat was balanced by sometimes great authoritativeness and great arrogance, and he would suddenly say, “I am the authority.” But then he would get out of that again. It was partly maybe like a really skillful novelist’s con, to get people to speak. And be uses that as a literary device in his novels, where he presents himself often as the straight guy and he lets the other guys be smart.

    I much appreciated what he had to say about spontaneous prose, although I never wrote prose. I think it influenced my journal writing a lot, some of which would, say, be registered in the book Earth House Hold. I think that I owe a lot to Jack in my prose style, actually. And my sense of poetics has been touched by Jack for sure.

    Our interchanges on Buddhism were on the playful and delightful level of exchanging the lore, exchanging what we knew about it, what he thought of Mahayana. He made up names. He would follow on the Mahayana Sutra invention of lists, and he would invent more lists, like the names of all the past Buddhas, the names of all the future Buddhas, the names of all the other universes. He was great at that. But it was not like a pair of young French intellectuals sitting down comparing their structural comprehension of something. We exchanged lore. And I would tell him, “Now look. Here are these Chinese Buddhists,” and that’s how we ended up talking about the Han-shan texts together, and I introduced him to the texts that give the anecdotes of the dialogues and confrontations between T’ang Dynasty masters and disciples, and of course he was delighted by that. Anybody is. ‘I’hat’s what we did.

    Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak on Her life & on Her work with Derrida

    April 30th, 2019
  • G.C. Spivak

    Interview Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak

    Because of the unusualness of my parents…my mother was very active. When the refugees from the newly created state of East Pakistan came in the millions into Calcutta at Independence at 5:00am in the morning she was in the railway station helping with rehabilitation. She helped establish a nunnery particularly for educated middle-class women who really wanted to get out of their lives, etc. She ran the first working women’s hostel in Calcutta so well that even the state asked her, “Mrs. Chakravorty, how do you do it? We failed!”

    Photo via

    Spivak – Interview

    Has your understanding of Derrida’s book changed over the four decades since you first translated it?

    So I found. When I began, I didn’t notice how critical the book was of “Eurocentrism” because the word in 1967 was not so common. Derrida was an Algerian Jew, born before World War II, who was actually encountering Western philosophy from the inside. A brilliant man, he was looking at its Eurocentrism.

    He also said a very powerful thing about African orality: they could remember seven generations back; we’ve lost that capacity. There, “writing” takes place on the psychic material called “memory.” Derrida connects this to Freud. So he was saying, look at reality carefully. It’s coded so that other people, even if they’re not present, can understand what we are saying. He looked at how this was suppressed in philosophical traditions.

  • Ornette Coleman and Derrida

  • Derrida was from Algeria – Previous post, Far from Men Viggo’s film about Algeria