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Algebra & Fire, Sandrine Kimberlain as Simoe de Beauvoir, Devos as Violette Leduc

November 22nd, 2014
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  • Martin Provost directed Violette. See Violette trailer here (youtube)

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  • Simone de Beauvoir and Sandrine Kimberlin (Jean Genet appeared in Violette but Sartre and Nelson Algren were mentioned briefly in the film)

    Violette review from Guardian

    Sandrine Kiberlain is superb as Simone de Beauvoir – demanding, principled and controlled. Emmanuelle Devos is even better as penniless, neurotic Violette Leduc, who arrives like a stalker on De Beauvoir’s doorstep with the dog-eared manuscript of her unpublished novel, L’Asphyxie (or Imprisoned in My Skin).

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    Violette Leduc

    In 1942 she met Maurice Sachs and Simone de Beauvoir, who encouraged her to write. Her first novel, L’Asphyxie (In the Prison of Her Skin), was published by Albert Camus for Éditions Gallimard and earned her praise from Jean-Paul Sartre, Jean Cocteau and Jean Genet.

  • The great Argentine writer Jorge Luis Borges once described poetry as “algebra and fire.” The same is true of politics. Watching Violette, you’re reminded that the women’s movement was born not only of theories about equality and justice — the algebra — but of the fire of personal testimony, the willingness of women to say what they had thought and felt for centuries but never fully dared say before. Such willingness is what Violette Leduc possessed, what Beauvoir recognized, and what eventually made her books best-selling touchstones for women in France. Sure, it also made her miserable to be around, but then again, likability isn’t everything. (via)

    Mademoiselle Chambon
    Volcanic Emotions – Film Notes.

    Martin Provost previous film (Seraphine)

    Anagram, Brando, Conversation & Depression – ABCD of Dick Cavett

    November 19th, 2014
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  • My wild night with Brando – Cavett revealed what happend that night after the interview.

  • History of Dick Cavett Show here.

  • 10 good Dick Cavett show episodes that prove good conversation makes good TV.

    A Last Look at Updike and Cheever by Dick Cavett.

    Alain Delon and Cavett played Jeu de mots . (youtube)

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    Two videos of Ingmar Bergman on Dick Cavett Show, his first and only appearance on American TV show.

    Amazing Anthony Burgess (youtube)

    Jill Jonhston and Dick Cavett 1JillandCavet

    Robert Altman talks about movie stuff (Youtube)

  • In 2008 Cavett entered an Iraq war dispute with a New York Times blog entry criticizing General David Petraeus, stating “I can’t look at Petraeus—his uniform ornamented like a Christmas tree with honors, medals, and ribbons—without thinking of the great Mort Sahl at the peak of his brilliance.” Cavett went on to recall Sahl’s expressed contempt of General Westmoreland’s display of medals, and criticized Petraeus for not speaking in plain language.

    Cavett currently stars in Hellman v. McCarthy (Literary Legends Declare War!) in New York City’s Abingdon Theatre. Cavett re-enacts his show of January 25, 1980 when literary critic Mary McCarthy appeared as a guest and declared that every word playwright Lillian Hellman wrote was a lie, including ‘and’ and ‘the’. Hellman later sued McCarthy for libel. The suit spanned more than four years.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dick_Cavett

    Psychology today.. talking about his Depresson.

    On the Couch… with Dick Cavett
    An American icon shares wit and wisdom about living with depression.

    Happy birthday Dick Cavett

    Sayonara Takakura Ken – Legendary Japanese Actor Dead at 83

    November 17th, 2014
  • Takakura Ken Legendary Japanese Actor Dead at 83 (South China Morning Post)
    Obits:
    BBC

    Obit from Twitch –

    Huffpo

    Takakura Ken’s favorite film is The Deer Hunter” (youtube – japanese only)

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    Film still from Yakuza (directed by Sydney Pollack)

  • Mainichi shinbun (photo slideshow).

  • Life Lessons – Martin Scorsese on The Importance of Visual Literacy

    November 17th, 2014
  • Edward Winkleman on Chuck Connelly.

    Interestingly, in 1989 Martin Scorsese was looking for an artist who could be a model for his film, New York Stories: Life Lessons. Several art dealers recommended Connelly. Subsequently, the “wild man artist” played by Nick Nolte was based on Chuck, and all of the artwork shown in the film was Connelly’s.

    A number of insiders in the art world are interviewed in the film, including the venerable gallery owner Annina Nosei, who launched both Chuck’s career and those of Basquiat and Schnabel.

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    Nestor Almendros (cinematographer) and Martin Scorsese.

    A Man with a Camera – Nestor Almendros (Previous post)..

  • Martin’s Top 10 (The River by Jean Renoir is #3)

  • Happy birthday Martin Scorsese!

  • François Couperin – Les Barricades Mysterieuses

    November 9th, 2014

    Les Barricades mysterieuses (Scott Tennant on Youtube)

    François Couperin

    (10 November 1668 – 11 September 1733) was a French Baroque composer, organist and harpsichordist.

  • Couperin :Troisième leçon des ténèbres, Tous les matins du monde

    Tous Les Matin du Monde was directed by Alain Corneau

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    Digital image and photo by Fung Lin Hall

    Notes to Younger Self – Sam Shepard & Art Garfunkel

    November 5th, 2014
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    Sam Shepard and Wim Wenders (Paris Texas)
    Happy birthday Sam Shepard.
    America on its way out of culture – interview -

    He recalls one of the play’s most notable stagings, in New York at the turn of the century, the two leads played by the late Philip Seymour Hoffman and John C Reilly, who alternated parts every so often to keep things lively.

    Shepard saw Seymour Hoffman a week before he died of a heroin overdose in February and says he had no inkling anything was awry. “He was overweight, but he was overweight a lot,” he says quietly. “And he was pretty tired. He said he was going to go back and take a nap… See, I don’t think he meant to kill himself, I think he had some bad heroin. Though I didn’t realise he was that much of a junkie.”

    He pauses. “I knew Robin [Williams] pretty well and Robin knew he wanted out – he had Parkinson’s. The two guys were very similar in that they were both overwhelmed by their own thing. I know a lot of people who’ve died… who’ve taken their own lives,” he continues after a moment of quiet. “But you know Patti [Smith], who’s an old, old friend of mine, she wrote a review of the new Murakami book that appeared in the New York Times, and at the end of it she said, ‘I don’t want to kill myself, I want to see what happens.’ And what a statement. I believe her.”

  • Happy birthday Art Garfunkel.. he has the most impressive reading list. He reads all the important literature. I like him in Bad Timing, Carnal Knowlege, Catch 22. In this video.. he explains how singing makes him happy. we’re happy and consoled by his beautiful voice and interpretation.

  • Nicolas Roeg directed Art Garfunkel in Bad Timing

  • La Ricotta – Pasolini Directed Orson Welles

    November 2nd, 2014
  • Pier Paulo Pasolini speaks. (youtube)

    “The simplest, poorest people, and the highly cultured intellectuals and artists are the most sincere, interesting people.” Pasolini said

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    Orson Welles and Pasolini

    A short film La Ricotta (full film on youtube)

    Grazie Giulio Tosi for the pointer.

  • Film Comment Interview

    With Welles, how did you get a result you felt was fruitful?
    For two reasons—first of all in La Ricotta Welles did not play another character. He played himself. What he really did was a caricature of himself. And also because Welles, in addition to being an actor, is also an intellectual—so in reality, I used him as an intellectual director rather than as an actor. Because he’s an extremely intelligent man, he understood right away and there was no problem. He brought it off well.. It was a very brief and simple part, with no great complications. I told him my intention and I let him do as he pleased. He understood what I wanted immediately and did it in a manner that was completely satisfying to me.

    Abel Ferrara on Posolini – (Willem Dafoe as Pasolini)

    Was there any moment that you considered incorporating Pasolini’s own style into this film?

    Ferrara: Well, he’s in my DNA. I’ve been watching this guy since I was a very young filmmaker. He’s a very important filmmaker. I’ve seen all of his stuff. Maybe in this film, we’re trying to exercise what he is to me. His style of filmmaking is what we believe in. He’s a teacher, he’s a master and we’re the students. It’s as simple as that. hIl Decameron] blew my mind. It was the types of films I wanted to make and the kind of film i wanted to imagine making. His expression, his freedom, the way he filmed people.

    Created an archive for Pier Paolo Pasolini

    Genpei Akasegawa – Death of Neo Dada Artist

    October 26th, 2014
  • R.I.P Genpei Akasegawa – (he was 77 years old.)

    Artnet (obit)

    Genpei Akasegawa is a pseudonymof Japanese artist Katsuhiko Akasegawa (born 1937). During the 1950s and 1960s, he became involved within the Neo-Dada movement, when he formed the Hi-Red Center collective. In 1970s he worked with the idea of Hyper-Art, ordinary street object that happened to look like a conceptual artwork. For what was to become the “Thousand-yen bill incident”, Akasegawa sent out invitations to a solo exhibition in 1963, in a cash envelope mailed through the post. The printed invitation reproduced a 1,000-yen note with the exhibition details at the back, when the local police notice, they arrested him for producing counterfeits.

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    “A Record of the Wind” by Genpei Akasagawa

  • Going Nowhere (see more images here)

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    See Zero yen

    His irreverent humor and cunning observation of everyday life made him popular as a writer, peaking with his 1998 book Rõjinryoku, in which he put forth a hilariously positive take on the declining capabilities of the elderly. Hyperart: Thomasson, marks a crucial turning point in his metamorphosis from a subversive culture to a popular culturatus.

  • R.I.P René Burri -Swiss Magnum Photographer

    October 20th, 2014
  • Photos by René Burri

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    Click to focus.

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    Yves Klein

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    Havana, 1963

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    Performance of Berthold BRECHT’s play “Mother Courage”.1959

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  • Rene Burri Magnum Photos

    The guardian

    Foto Post Blog

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    Martine Franck and Cartier Bresson

  • 24h Paris

    René Burri (9 April 1933 – 20 October 2014) was a Swiss photographer known for his photos of major political, historical and cultural events and key figures of the second half of the 20th century. Burri worked for Magnum Photos and has been photographing political, military and artistic figures and scenes since 1946. He made portraits of Che Guevara and Pablo Picasso as well as iconic pictures of São Paulo and Brasília.

    Matisse & the Nun, Model & a Collaborator

    October 20th, 2014
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    photo via

    A Model for Matisse available on netflix. (see nice photos)

    Monique Bourgeois 1MatisseMonique-Bourgeois-2 later Sister Jacques-Marie

    NY times on Sister Jacques-Marie

    As a painter he loved the splendid mass of her dark hair and the way her neck rose from her shoulders like a white tower,” Hilary Spurling, his biographer, wrote.

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    Monique Bourgeois, as Sister Jacques-Marie was known before she took orders, was the 21-year-old daughter of a soldier. Her upbringing had been painfully strict: she had never worn make-up or read a book without asking her mother’s permission. Her parents told her she was ugly and would never amount to anything.
    When Matisse took her on, she was astonished. She certainly didn’t fit the description of the girl he had advertised for. ‘Young I certainly was,’ she later said. ‘But pretty? Hmmm.’
    Matisse, however, was charmed.
    ‘Who said you were ugly?’ he asked her. ‘Your parents?’

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  • According to Ms. Spurling’s book, “Matisse the Master,” the lonely Matisse “found warmth and comfort in the uncomplicated affection” of the nun. Accounts of the chapel’s genesis vary, but according to Ms. Freed, the filmmaker, Sister Jacques-Marie sketched an Assumption for Matisse and he urged her to turn it into a stained-glass window. It happened that the rest home, Foyer Lacordaire, was hoping to convert a ramshackle garage used for prayer into a full-fledged chapel, and Matisse wondered if displaying the window could help raise money.

    With the aid of a monk convalescing at the rest home, Matisse roughed out a sketch for a chapel, and Sister Jacques-Marie made the working model. Soon Matisse immersed himself in every aspect of the chapel, from the brushstroke sketches of a Stations of the Cross mural to the vestments and the slender Crucifixion altarpiece. The stained-glass windows, with one pair, “Tree of Life,” suggestive of a flowering cactus, are regarded as particular triumphs; they allow lemon-yellow, bottle-green and blue light to play capriciously against white-tiled walls and the marble floor.

    Sister Jacques-Marie did preliminary design work and offered candid evaluations. As important, she ran interference with her local superior, who disapproved of a chapel designed by an artist known for his nudes. In the end, Matisse described the chapel as “their shared project.” When Sister Jacques-Marie told Matisse that she believed he was inspired by God Almighty, he replied gently, “Yes, but that god is me.”

    Matisse by Robert Capa Photo of Matisse
    by Robert Capa (Previous post War and Ingrid Bergman)

  • Caterpiller – Koji Wakamatsu

    October 17th, 2014
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  • Caterpiller trailer
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  • Caterpiller wiki

    Caterpillar is a 2010 Japanese drama film directed by Kōji Wakamatsu, partially drawn from Edogawa Rampo’s banned short-story “The Caterpillar” (芋虫 Imomushi?)
    The film is a critique of the right-wing militarist nationalism that guided Japan’s conduct in Asia during the Second Sino-Japanese War and World War II. The film deals with various issues, such as war crimes, handicapped veterans, and spousal abuse. The film also deals with themes of sexual perversion and features graphic sex scenes.

    It was nominated for the Golden Bear at the 60th Berlin International Film Festival.[4] Shinobu Terajima received the Silver Bear for Best Actress at the Berlin Film Festival for her portrayal of Kurokawa’s wife.

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    (1 April 1936 – 17 October 2012)

    MUBI page

    The Essential Films of Koji Wakamatsu

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    Toru Takemitsu – How His Film Scores Shaped Post War Japanese Cinema

    October 8th, 2014
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    Toru Takemitsu (武満 徹 Takemitsu Tōru, October 8, 1930 – February 20, 1996) photo by Kinoshita Akira

    Composer and writer on aesthetics and music theory. Takemitsu’s contribution to film music was considerable; in under 40 years he composed music for over 100 films. via wiki

    Follow his works.. you’ll get the best of post war Japanese cinema.

  • Double suicide Double Suicide Trailer (youtube)

  • See Woman in the Dunes full film (Abe Kobo, Teshigahara, Toru Takemitsu)

    Hiroshi Teshigahara Two films based on novels by Abe Kobo, The Face of Another, Woman in the Dunes, Rikyu about the zen/artist/tea master. and Pitfall –
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    The Burmese Harp full film (youtube) directed by Kon Ichikawa

  • Harakiri – trailer (youtube) (With Masaki Kobayashi – Takemitsu also did the film scores for Kwaidan and Samurai Rebellion)

  • Takemitsu also composed for Black Rain (Imamura Shohei), Ran, Dodeskaden (Akira Kurosawa), Empire of Passion (Nagisa Oshima) and Rising Sun (Philip Kaufman).

  • Toru T and Iannis Xenakis 1toruXennakis click to see large

    Iannis Xenakis (previous post)