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Vanishing Techniques, Foto by Baudrillard + Military Avoidance of Marcel Duchamp

July 28th, 2015
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    Vanishing Techniques – photography of Jean Baudrillard
    Jean Baudrillard was born on 27 July 1929.

    RIP Jean Baudrillard (previous post)
    Sainte Beuve Saint Veuve photo by Jean Beaudrillard

    Then, on one of my trips to Japan, I was given a camera, and I began to try it out a bit, taking photographs from the plane on the return journey.
    I like photography as something completely empty, ‘irreal’, as something that preserves the idea of a silent apparition.

  • Marcel Duchamp enfamceMarcel

    Military avoidance

    The essay traces military relationships in the work of Marcel Duchamp (1887–1968), paying particular attention to his notes of 1912 known as the ‘Jura-Paris Road’. These are interpreted as ‘military texts’ and the author shows how military concerns remained with Duchamp throughout his career, resulting in facetious outcomes that obscured uneasy preoccupations.

    Marcel Duchamp was born on 28 July 1887.

    Documentary Films on Robert Noyce + Michael Fassbender as Steve Jobs

    July 18th, 2015
  • Silicon Valley Rebels (youtube)

  • These two documentaries recount the history of Silicon Valley and the creation of the digital integrated circuits without which modern digital technology would not exist. They focus on pioneer Fairchild Semiconductor founded by Robert Noyce, Gordon Moore, and others and their second move to start Intel (founded on this day July 18, 1968), creator of the microprocessor. Forming the backbone of a new industry, the later work of Apple and others would not have been possible. Yet these pioneers and their companies do not get the attention given to those applying their technologies. Early on, Gordon Moore saw that advances in digital integrated circuitry was so rapid that the capacity of the devices doubled every 18 months. This became known as “Moore’s Law” and still holds today. Your tiny phone with built in camera, GPS, WIFI, etc. is the result of these continuous advancements now in their fifth decade.

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    Robert Noyce Intel

    Robert Noyce

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    Steve Jobs and Robert Noyce

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  • Goodbye Omar Shariff

    July 10th, 2015
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    Remembering Omar Sharif – a star in two skies

    Legendary Egyptian actor Omar Sharif died today in Cairo, according to his agent. He was 83.

  • Reactions from his friends.(LA times)

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  • On the Move, the Brain and the Heart of Oliver Sacks

    July 8th, 2015
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    Happy birthday Oliver Sacks! (July 9, 1933)

    “I sometimes wonder why I have spent more than fifty years in New York, when it was the West, and especially the Southwest, which so enthralled me. I now have many ties in New York—to my patients, my students, my friends, and my analyst—but I have never felt it move me the way California did. I suspect my nostalgia may be not only for the place itself but for youth, and a very different time, and being in love, and being able to say, ‘The future is before me.'” —from ON THE MOVE

    David Ehrenstein Exemplary Life of Oliver Sacks

    Famed neurologist exchanged his white coat by nightfall for motorcycle leathers

    Oliver Sacks on Twitter

    Vanity Fair with photo slideshow

    Atlantic -Oliver knows what it really means to live

    In Bloom – Two Young Girls Growing up in Tbilisi

    July 7th, 2015
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  • In Bloom (youtube trailer)

  • NYtimes review In Bloom Coming-of-Age in Wartime

    Film Comment In Bloom – Nana Ekvtimshvili and Simon Gross

    Georgian Filmmaker – Nana Ekvtimishvili

    The debut feature from Georgian filmmaker Nana Ekvtimishvili, In Bloom, is a powerful coming-of-age story that takes place in in 1992, just after the collapse of the Soviet Union. Shot in Tbilisi, the capital of Georgia, it’s about two 14 year-olds, Eka (Lika Babluani) and her best friend Natia (Mariam Bokeria) whose ordinary lives—school, friends, domestic strife—are set against the sudden changes to the social order of the country as well as a backdrop of war in the Abkhazia region. Ekvtimishvili, who attended film school in Potsdam- Babelsberg, Germany, wrote the script based on personal experiences, and co-directed it with her German husband, Simon Gross.

  • Zhang Ke Chun – Between the Mountains and Water- Photography of China

    July 1st, 2015
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    Zhang Kechun born 1980 in Sichuan, China, is a artist currently based in Chengdu

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    Buddha 鍥惧儚 008

    Photography of China

    Thanks to Giulo Tosi

    Krzysztof Kieslowski – His Life & His Search for Mysterious Connections

    June 27th, 2015
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    Krzysztof Kieslowski
    (27 June 1941 – 13 March 1996)

    There are mysteries, secret zones in each individual.-

    Different people in different parts of the world can be thinking the same thoughts at the same time. It’s an obsession of mine, that different people, in different places, are thinking the same thing, but for different reasons. I try to make films which connect people.

  • At one point he was filming Three Colors: White (1994) while editing Three Colors: Blue (1993) and writing Three Colors: Red (1994).

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    A short film about killing ..
    “In Poland, this film was instrumental in the abolition of the death penalty.”

    Images from Decalogue

  • Master class interview (youtube)

    See film stills Doublie life of Veronique

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    Kieslowski tells his own biography through Camera Buff. Both in approach and subject matter, Filip’s early films mirror Kieslowski’s own first documentaries.

    One of his favorite films was Ken Loach’s Kes.

    [on Ingmar Bergman]: I can identify with what Bergman says about life, about what he says about love. I identify more or less with his attitude towards the world… towards men and women and what we do in everyday life… forgetting about what is most important.

    His signature work, “Talking Heads” (1980), consisted of a string of short interviews with people answering two unvarying questions: “Who are you?” and “What do you want in life?” As we progressed from a newborn to a woman 100 years of age, birth years of the interviewees flashed on the screen as a sort of cosmic countdown. By the end of the film, as the subsequent faces bore ever-deeper signs of aging and the expressed concerns shifted from the mundane to the eternal, the film revealed itself as a single story of hope, work, failure, compromise and rebirth.

    (via wiki)

    In an interview given at Oxford University, Kieślowski said the following:

    It comes from a deep-rooted conviction that if there is anything worthwhile doing for the sake of culture, then it is touching on subject matters and situations which link people, and not those that divide people. There are too many things in the world which divide people, such as religion, politics, history, and nationalism. If culture is capable of anything, then it is finding that which unites us all. And there are so many things which unite people. It doesn’t matter who you are or who I am, if your tooth aches or mine, it’s still the same pain. Feelings are what link people together, because the word ‘love’ has the same meaning for everybody. Or ‘fear’, or ‘suffering’. We all fear the same way and the same things. And we all love in the same way. That’s why I tell about these things, because in all other things I immediately find division.[12]

    In the foreword to Decalogue: The Ten Commandments,[13] Stanley Kubrick wrote:

    I am always reluctant to single out some particular feature of the work of a major filmmaker because it tends inevitably to simplify and reduce the work. But in this book of screenplays by Krzysztof Kieślowski and his co-author, Krzysztof Piesiewicz, it should not be out of place to observe that they have the very rare ability to dramatize their ideas rather than just talking about them. By making their points through the dramatic action of the story they gain the added power of allowing the audience to discover what’s really going on rather than being told. They do this with such dazzling skill, you never see the ideas coming and don’t realize until much later how profoundly they have reached your heart.

    Stanley Kubrick January 1991[14]

  • RIP Harold Feinstein Photos of Coney Island, War & People

    June 25th, 2015
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    Gypsie Girl at the Carousel, Coney Isalnd, 1949

    Harold Feinstein

    Harold Feinstein was born in Coney Island in 1931 and began his photography career in 1946 at age 15.
    Within four short years, Edward Steichen, an early supporter, had purchased his work for the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art.

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    Mother’s Curtains, by Harold Feinstein, 1948

    Interview

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    Draftees on Troup Ship 1953

  • Coney Island sheet music —Boardwalk Sheet-music Montage, Coney Island, 1950 of and for the people!

    Eulogy

    It is with much sadness that I do this video. Harold Feinstein passed away on June 20, 2015 at the age of 84. Harold was born in Brooklyn, NY in 1931. At the age of 17, 4 of his prints were purchased by Edward Steichen for the collection at MoMA. He had an over 70 year career as a street photographer, photojournalist, designer, and teacher.

    Harold is one of the greatest and most underrated photographers of our time.

    Remembering Ellen (photos of Mary Ellen Mark by Harold Feinstein)

    Mary Ellen Mark 1940 – 2015

  • From a Single Mother to a Powerful Film Critic – Pauline Kael’s Extraordinary Life

    June 19th, 2015
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    artforum

    Review of her biography

  • June 19, 1919 – birthday of Pauline Kael
    she was a single mother, her daughter named Gia became her secretary (a bit like Gray Gardens). Poet/filmmaker James Broughton was her father. We learned from Kael that Henri Pierre Roche (writer of Jules et Jim) introduced Gertrude Stein to Picasso.. she nurtured Paul Schrader.. and other young critics.. they became Paulettes. She championed Altman, Arthur Penn..she overpraised Brian de Palma.. Her review on Kon Ichikawa’s Makioka Sisters was superb.. this blogger loves her essay on Cary Grant. She picked fights with Andrew Sarris.

    She preferred…
    John Huston (proficient and gifted ) over Nicholas Ray (erratic) (page 78)
    Carol Reed over Hitchcock
    She published her review of Nashville before the film was released..
    “Pauline Kael approached her subjects predatorily: she called Clint Eastwood a “tall, cold cod” and a “fascist””

    The Man from the Dream City (Pauline K. on Cary Grant)

  • “It seems likely that many of the young who don’t wait for others to call them artists, but simply announce that they are, don’t have the patience to make art.” Pauline K.

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    (1977 at Cannes)

  • Pauline Kael reviews

    Pauline Kael Five Classics – interesting collection here.

    New Yorker piece (The Group episode)

    Pauline Kael and 1duncanKael Robert Duncan

    Pauline Kael – Robert Duncan Selected Letters

    Pauline Kael and Robert Duncan met in the 1930s as students at the University of California-Berkeley. After both dropped out, they maintained a six year correspondence recording the trials, excitements, and discoveries of life after Berkeley. The Selected Letters, 1945-46 captures their singular friendship and the mutual interests and sensibilities that united them. Highlights include a dialogue on reading Herman Melville’s Pierre; reflections by Duncan on farm-life in Northern California; notes on his preparation of his manuscript The Years as Catches and Kael’s work on a play; and from New York, Kael’s reportage on art-shows, films, music, and discussion meetings tied to Dwight Macdonald’s journal Politics.

  • Frank Rich on Pauline Kael Kael loved Jean Renoir and Satyjit Ray.. her role models are James Agee and Marny Farber.

    Kis Kiss Bang Bang..(page 114 -115)
    Louise Brooks has been an admirer of Pauline Kael.. they’ve been corresponding.

    Pauline prized Edna O’Brien (the story of Adele – mad romantic pursuit page 231).
    Review of her bio NYtimes .Iron Lady.

    It recalls the critic who championed sensuous, exciting movies and eviscerated ponderous or pretentious ones

  • Two links from Roger Ebert on Pauline Kael

    She was the most powerful, loved and hated film critic of her time, but her work cannot be discussed objectively by simply reading it. She challenges you on every page, she’s always in your face, and she functioned as the arbiter of any social group she joined. She was quite a dame.
    She might have liked that- “quite a dame.” She wrote with slangy, jazzy prose, always pepped up, spinning on the edge of a whirlpool.

    Pauline Kael on art and trash, life and lice

    Moreau and Ebert (happy days)

    June 18 Ebert’s birthday .. (previous post – the Last picture show)

    Goodbye Ornette Coleman & Memory of Ornette & Derrida

    June 11th, 2015
  • NYtimes obit

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    Derrida Interviews Ornette – The Others Langauge (Three of Being)

    Philosopher Jacques Derrida Interviews Jazz Legend Ornette Coleman: Talk Improvisation, Language & Racism (1997)

    One more lengthy article on Ornette Coleman and Derrida

    previous post (see videos – Chappaqua suite & Naked Lunch)

    John Lurie – June 11 2015 via FB

    When I first started playing saxophone and discovered Ornette Coleman he freed me up. He put me on a path that made sense for me to follow.
    I would search the Worcester Public Library for anything about jazz and found a book about him and Cecil Taylor. For some reason the line that stayed with me that Ornette said was, “I knew I was on to something when I found I could make mistakes.” That hit me so profoundly. Yeah, that is exactly right, even if no one but you knows, you are on to something if you can make mistakes.
    I managed to see him play often. When he took his solo at the end of Skies in America at Carnegie Hall, Bill Noel turned to me and said, “he just stopped time.”
    Which was also exactly right.
    Later, when the Lounge Lizards started he was remarkably supportive and helpful to the young band leader following in his footsteps.
    And much much later, when I had found my musical voice, I had some of the guys in my band that he used to hire, but was having a really rough time with them.
    So I called Ornette and we had an amazing two hour conversation
    about running a band.
    Ornette’s passing hit me really hard. He meant something to me and not because of all the musical innovations that he made, which are many but because of the sweetness in him. Almost like an angel.

    Alan Turing – Thinking Machine by Henrik Olesen

    June 7th, 2015
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    What interests me about the TURING biography is not only the way it illustrates the boundaries and histories of the 20th century, but that it also seems almost like a gendered prophecy. In a horrifying way, TURING ’s body was injured by the violence of modern ideology, he lost his own body, in a way, but he also made a new one. In 1936, he published a theoretical model of a machine that was to constitute the basis of all post-war computing, making him the father of all modern computer science. And this part of his biography is a futuristic tale about thinking machines, artificial intelligence and the appearance of possible future bodies. And to me, this is a long-needed escape from biological, heterosexual reproduction. – HENRIK OLESEN for Mousse Magazine

    Alan Turing Art project by Henrik Olesen

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  • Alan Turing 1954 (7 June): Death (suicide) by cyanide poisoning, Wilmslow, Cheshire.

    Can machine think?

  • How Alan Turing solved the enigma of Solitaire in letter to girl, 8

    Nico Muhuly takes on Alan Turing

    See the codebreaker.. (not starring Benedict Cumberbatch).

    More link on the Imitation game -

    Nature Means Everything – Ellsworth Kelly

    May 31st, 2015
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    Artnet LA

  • He is talking here.. (Youtube)

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    Via Gemini

    See Agnes Martin black and yellow..(scroll down) untitled one.

    Find Ellsworth Kelly’s black and yellow here.

  • Happy birthday Ellworth Kelly

    After being abroad for six years, Kelly decided to return to America in 1954. He was interested after reading a review of an Ad Reinhardt exhibit, to which he felt his work related. Upon his return to New York, he found the art world “very tough.”[1] Although Kelly is now considered an essential innovator and contributor to the American art movement, it was hard for many to find the connection between Kelly’s art and the dominant stylistic trends.[7] In May 1956 Kelly had his first New York exhibition at Betty Parsons’ Gallery. His art was considered more European than was popular in New York.

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    (Vertical)

    Kelly’s background in the military has been suggested as a source of the seriousness of his works. While serving time in the army, Kelly was exposed to and influenced by the camouflage with which his specific battalion worked. This close contact helped enlighten him on the use of form and shadow as well as the construction and deconstruction of the visible. It was a basic part of Kelly’s early education as an artist. Ralph Coburn, a friend of Kelly’s from Boston, introduced the technique of automatic drawing to him while he was visiting Kelly in Paris. Kelly embraced this technique of arriving at an image without looking at the sheet of paper upon which the image is drawn. These techniques helped Kelly in loosening his particular drawing style and broaden his acceptance of what he believed to be art. Kelly’s illness and coexistent depression may possibly be related to his use of black and white during his last year in Paris.

  • I just feel like I can live on. I hope I can reach 100. I think today if you just keep doing, keep working, that – maybe that’s possible. – Ellsworth Kelly

    I’m constantly investigating nature – nature, meaning everything.

    Read more at Brainy quote