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Emerson,Raymond Carver & Theodore Rothke – American Originals

May 25th, 2016
  • 1cEmerson
    Ralph Waldo Emerson -b. May 25, 1803

    1) When asked to sum up his work, he said his central doctrine was “the infinitude of the private man.” Emerson is also well known as a mentor and friend of fellow Transcendentalist Henry David Thoreau (via wiki )
    Walt Whitman sent a copy of Leaves of Grass to Emerson.
    Emerson was strongly influenced by the Vedas, and much of his writing has strong shades of nondualism. One of the clearest examples of this can be found in his essay “The Over-soul”:

    Quotes by Emerson

    Children are all foreigners.

    Democracy becomes a government of bullies tempered by editors.

    Do not go where the path may lead, go instead where there is no path and leave a trail.

    Don’t be too timid and squeamish about your actions. All life is an experiment. The more experiments you make the better.

    Emerson tweets
    – What I must do is all that concerns me, not what the people think
    – I can find my biography in every fable.

  • 1aCarverRay
    Raymond Carver -b. May 25, 1938

  • Prose as Architecture: two interviews with Raymond Carver

    Suppose I say summer,
    write the word “hummingbird,”
    put it in an envelope,
    take it down the hill
    to the box. When you open
    my letter you will recall
    those days and how much,
    just how much, I love you.
    Raymond Carver

    Dreams Are What We Wake Up From, directed by Daisy Goodwin. (Youtube)

  • Theodore Rothke 1acunninghamRothke

    b. May 25, 1908
    photo by Imogen Cunningham, 1959

    MY PAPA’S WALTZ

    The whiskey on your breath
    Could make a small boy dizzy;
    But I hung on like death:
    Such waltzing was not easy.

    We romped until the pans
    Slid from the kitchen shelf;
    My mother’s countenance
    Could not unfrown itself.

    The hand that held my wrist
    Was battered on one knuckle;
    At every step you missed
    My right ear scraped a buckle.

    You beat time on my head
    With a palm caked hard by dirt,
    Then waltzed me off to bed
    Still clinging to your shirt.

  • 5 Poems by Rothke on youtube here.

  • Robert Creeley – Two Poems & Two Photos – May 21, 2016

    May 21st, 2016
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    Robert Creeley (Photo by Jonathan Williams)

  • I know a man

    by Robert Creeley

    As I sd to my
    friend, because I am
    always talking,—John, I

    sd, which was not his
    name, the darkness sur-
    rounds us, what

    can we do against
    it, or else, shall we &
    why not, buy a goddamn big car,

    drive, he sd, for
    christ’s sake, look
    out where yr going.

    Poem via

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    Ginsberg, Anne Wildman and Robert Creeley.

  • Anne Wildman she has multiplied – number song.

  • America
    by Robert Creeley

    America, you ode for reality!
    Give back the people you took.

    Let the sun shine again
    on the four corners of the world

    you thought of first but do not
    own, or keep like a convenience.

    People are your own word, you
    invented that locus and term.

    Here, you said and say, is
    where we are. Give back

    what we are, these people you made,
    us, and nowhere but you to be.

    “America” Creeley’s poem serves to highlight the inconsistent attitude of America. Too often the nation is caught up in world affairs rather than addressing the issues at home.” via

    Kenji Mizoguchi (May 16, 1898 – August 24, 1956) – & His Actresses

    May 16th, 2016
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    Kenji Mizoguchi and actresses on the set of his film “Street of Shame (Akasen Chitai)
    Kenji Mizoguchi (溝口 健二 Mizoguchi Kenji, May 16, 1898 – August 24, 1956)

    10 Essential Films- Kenji Mizoguchi

    Some must-see titles from the long career of one of the great masters of Japanese cinema, famed for his exquisite travelling shots and fierce critiques of his country’s patriarchal inequality.

  • Based on an ancient legend, as recounted by celebrated author Mori Ōgai (in his short story of the same name, written in 1915), and adapted by Mizoguchi, Sanshō Dayū [Sanshō the Steward, aka Sanshō the Bailiff] is both distinctively Japanese and as deeply affecting as a Greek tragedy. Described in its opening title as “one of the oldest and most tragic in Japan’s history”, Mizoguchi depicts an unforgettably sad story of social injustice, family love, and personal sacrifice – all conveyed with exquisite tone and purity of emotion. Master of Cinema

  • Oharu 1aKOharu
    Tanak Kinuyo as Oharu.. she was his muse.

  • Ayako Wakao 1ayakoGion
    with Michio Kogure..from Sisters of Gion.

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    Yamada Isuzu in Sisters of gion, (Mizoguchi)
    Osaka elegy, (Mizoguchi)

  • Okada as Judge
    from Water Magician/Taki no Shiraito’

    Water magician

    Donald Richie writes that this was the first of Mizoguchi’s “woman’s pictures.” By this, he is referring to the many movies that Mizoguchi made which featured female lead roles and heroines.

    Mori Ogai (previous post)

    Martin Friedman Visonary Director of Walker Art Center Dies at 90

    May 14th, 2016
  • Martin Friedman Visonary Director of Walker Art Center Dies at 90

    Walker Art Org – obit

  • 1aFriedMartinCage
    (Martin Friedman and John Cage )

    During his nearly four-decade relationship with the Walker Art Center, composer John Cage visited Minneapolis numerous times. As Walker director emeritus Martin Friedman recalls, these visits often veered toward the unexpected—fitting for an artist whose name is closely associated with the musical concept of Indeterminacy—from Sunday-morning mushroom hunting on a church lawn to a late-night reading of James Joyce with sculptor Tony Smith.

    <

  • 1aMarcelMartin1965
    Marcel Duchamp and Martin Friedman 1965

  • See Slideshow photos here.

    with Ellsworth Kelly

  • Martin 1aFriedmanVincent and Vincent Price.

    R.I.P Louisa Chase – (1951–2016)

    May 10th, 2016
  • 1artChase,-Louisa
    Photo via

    R.I.P Louisa Chase

    American artist Louisa Chase has died. Born in Panama City in 1951.

    “Her joyous approach to working in the studio, coupled with her precocious creativity, made it a pleasure to turn up every day and struggle with the challenge of facing a blank canvas. She was born to be an artist, which she proved over and over.”

  • 1artLouisaEtch

    See more art here (art net)

    (via)

    Alicia Vikander in “Pure’ & Sylvie Testude in “Lourdes” – Two films directed by Women

    May 5th, 2016
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    1aliciaPure

    Alicia Vikander from “Pure”, A gem of Swedish Cinema.

    “Courage is life’s only measure,” says Kierkegaard. In the 2010 film Pure by Lisa Langseth, this phrase isn’t only quoted, it is central to the story. Pure tells the tale of 20-year-old Katarina, a young and troubled soul who discovers peace and inspiration in the works of Mozart. Her story begins in a broken suburban home and ends in high culture Stockholm, where Katarina is ultimately tasked with introducing her passion of classical music to kids like herself in culture-barren ghettos. Her path is both bitter and beautiful, magical and tragic all at once. Audiences who join Katarina’s ride are in for a rare treat…

    Alicia won the best actress in Sweden.

  • Lourdes 1aLourdes

    Jessica Hausner is an Austrian film director and screenwriter. She has directed six films since 1995.

    Sylvie Testud called Lourdes a fairly tale.. (youtube Interview)

  • Related links
    Female directors pick their favorite films made by women.

    50 films by women filmmaker you can watch online..

    Daniel Berrigan, Poet, Jesuit Priest, Peace Activist Dies at 94

    May 1st, 2016
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    (DANIEL REV.BERRIGAN read two poems at . meeting In the Immaculate Conception Churchmen, then warned that the United States Is “being governed by wounded leaden.)

    Daniel Berrigan, Poet,Jesuit Priest, Peace Activist Dies at 94.
    NYtimes obit

    Daniel Berrigan (wiki)

    Protest against the Vietnam war..Berrigan, his brother Josephite priest Philip Berrigan, and Trappist monk Thomas Merton founded an interfaith coalition against the Vietnam War, and wrote letters to major newspapers arguing for an end to the war. In 1967, Daniel and Phillip were arrested for pouring blood on draft records as part of the Baltimore Four. Phillip was sentenced to six years in prison for defacing government property. This, and his belief that his support of prisoners of war during the war was not acknowledged and appreciated, further radicalized Berrigan against the United States government.

    Berrigan traveled to Hanoi with Howard Zinn during the Tet Offensive in January 1968 to “receive” three American airmen, the first American POWs released by the North Vietnamese since the U.S. bombing of that nation had begun.

  • The Church should be making art not just cover bands.

  • Berrigan with Merton 1aBerriganMerton

    photo via

    Father Berrigan said that coaching the film’s stars, Robert De Niro and Jeremy Irons, on their roles as priests had been like working on two different planets. Irons plays the head of the mission and De Niro portrays an ex- mercenary and slave trader who becomes a priest.

    “Irons is more of a method actor,” said Father Berrigan. “He wanted to get inside the thinking of a Jesuit. I told him the only thing to do was to fast. He and I spent a day without food or water, and Irons frequently went off my himself to meditate.

    “De Niro is a natural genius. All he wanted to do was question me for hours about being a priest.”

    via Philly.com.

    He also had a way of popping up in the wider culture: as the “radical priest” in Paul Simon’s song “Me and Julio Down by the Schoolyard”; as inspiration for the character Father Corrigan in Colum McCann’s 2009 novel, “Let the Great World Spin.” He even had a small movie role, appearing as a Jesuit priest in “The Mission” in 1989.

    Looking Back In Gratitude

    On my return to America House after the interview, I looked up the poem in the June 13, 1942, issue; it is called “Storm-Song,” an ode to the Virgin Mary. A decade or so later, an editor at Macmillan who had heard about Berrigan’s poetry asked him for a collection of his poems. He told Berrigan that he would give it to the “toughest reader” at Macmillan; and if the report was good, “we’ll publish it.” That reader turned out to be Marianne Moore, a highly regarded poet, who gave the manuscript a glowing report. It led to the publication in 1953 of Berrigan’s first book of poetry, Time Without Number, which won the Lamont Poetry Prize in 1957.

    Round Midnight Photo Exhibit of Cy Twombly, Dexter, Bertrand, Ella, Marilyn & Paul Mazursky

    April 25th, 2016
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    Photograph of Cy Twombly by Robert Rauschenberg
    Cy Twombly with Relics
    Cy Twombly birthday April 25, 1928.

  • Dexter & Bertrand 1aBertDexter
    Happy birthdayBertrand Tavernier .

  • Ella and Marilyn 1aEllaMarilyn
    Ella Jane Fitzgerald, April 25, 1917 (birthday)

    During the ‘50s, one of the most popular venues was Mocambo in Hollywood. Frank Sinatra made his Los Angeles debut at Mocambo in 1943, and it was frequented by the likes of Clark Gable, Charlie Chaplin, Humphrey Bogart, Lauren Bacall and Lana Turner.

    Fitzgerald was not allowed to play at Mocambo because of her race. Then, one of her biggest fans made a telephone call that quite possibly changed the path of her career for good. Here, she tells the story of how Marilyn Monroe changed her life:

  • Paul Mazursky 1ePaulMazurskyr his birthday was also April 25.

  • Willem De Kooning – Mini Retrospective – 2016

    April 24th, 2016
  • <> <> deKooning

    The attitude that nature is chaotic and that the artist puts order into it is a very absurd point of view, I think. All that we can hope for is to put some order into ourselves.

    Willem de Kooning April 24, 1904

  • In his studio ..De Kooning photography by Fred McDarrah

    De Kooning in His Broadway Studio, March 23, 1962
    Vintage gelatin silver print, printed 1962

    Well, I have my beautiful de Kooning
    to aspire to. I think it has an orange
    bed in it, more than the ear can hold

    Frank O’Hara
    (See Summer Couch from – In Memory of My Feelings)

  • De Kooning 1aDeKooning1958
    1958
    1aJaneRuthKligmanWD

    Jane Freukcher with Ruth Kligman and DeKooning.

    Under the Cherry Moon – Good Night Dear Prince

    April 21st, 2016
  • The Artist 1artistPrince

    With Kristin Scott Thomas 1artistKristin

  • Billboards – Geoffrey Ballet -

    R.I.P Malick Sidibe – Mali Photographer of Youth, Women and Joy

    April 16th, 2016
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    Malick Sidibé

    NYtimes. Malick Sidibe Photographer known for social reportage in Mali dies at 80.

    He attended Saturday-night parties at which young Malians, dressed to the nines, danced the twist, the rumba and the merengue to the Beatles, James Brown and Afro-Caribbean music. This was Mali’s youthquake, and Mr. Sidibé was its photographic witness.

    “For me, photography is all about youth,” he told The Daily Telegraph of London in 2008. “It’s about a happy world full of joy, not some kid crying on a street corner or a sick person.”

  • 1amalick

  • Malick Sidibé: Portrait of the Artist as a Portraitist (Trailer)

  • 1a-malick-sidibe-the

    See more photos from The Redlist

    Tony Conrad – Drone and Minimal, Avand Garde Musicians & Filmmaker Died at 76

    April 10th, 2016
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    Tony Conrad (Boingboing)

    Tony Conrad, drone and minimalist music pioneer, RIP

  • 1aConrad1979
    Wish You Were (Buffalo Avant Garde)

    Tony Conrad (American, born 1940). Examinations, 1979. Pencil on paper with Lucite, strap, and bed, drawing:

  • For a generation of musicians and filmmakers in Buffalo and around the world, Tony Conrad was the walking embodiment of the avant garde.

    Mr. Conrad, who died Saturday morning in Hospice Buffalo, Cheektowaga, at 76 after fighting prostate cancer, began his career as an underground musician and filmmaker and ended it as an internationally idolized composer, performer, professor and thinker.

    He served as a widely admired faculty member of the University at Buffalo’s media study department from 1976 until his death, during which time he was instrumental in the formation of Squeaky Wheel Media Arts Center, the growth of Buffalo’s cable access network and countless exhibitions, collectives and collaborations on city streets, cable channels and in institutions across the region.

    Despite a diverse career that significantly impacted the lives of thousands of students, as well as the trajectory of visual art and music in the United States and far beyond, Mr. Conrad is perhaps best-known for inspiring the name of influential rock band The Velvet Underground when he was getting his start as an artist in New York City.

    Anthony S. Conrad was born March 7, 1940, in Concord, N.H. He earned a degree in mathematics from Harvard University in 1962 before moving to New York City and beginning his career as an experimental musician, composer and filmmaker. During his time in New York, he collaborated with musicians John Cale, LaMonte Young and others in a loose collective known as the Theatre of Eternal Music and later as the Dream Syndicate, whose work would spawn and influence several new genres of music, including drone, minimalism, punk and electronica.http://buffalo.com/2016/04/09/news/art/tony-conrad-avant-garde-pioneer-ub-professor-dies-76