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Zhang Ke Chun – Between the Mountains and Water- Photography of China

July 1st, 2015
  • 1buDeer

    Zhang Kechun born 1980 in Sichuan, China, is a artist currently based in Chengdu

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    1BChinaZhang

    Buddha 鍥惧儚 008

    Photography of China

    Thanks to Giulo Tosi

    Taiwan’s Hou Hsiao-hsien wins Cannes best director award for ‘The Assassin’

    May 24th, 2015
  • 1AssassinCannes

    Winners at Cannes

    The Assassin trailer here.

  • 3timesHOU
    (Three Times)

  • “The main thing is for the actors to forget the camera. They have to act as if they are working in a documentary.”

  • Cinescope on Hou Hsieu Hsien – Master of Modern World

  • Hou Hsiao Hsien filmography here.

  • The director on long takes fast edits and a warrior in the shadows.

    It took about a year to make the movie, including three or so months of shooting. They spent a month in Japan, Mr. Hou said, and the gorgeous exterior shots were shot in central China and Inner Mongolia, the site of a silver birch forest in which Yinniang has one of her fiercest battles. Mr. Hou said that he didn’t rehearse the film, which is fairly astonishing given the precision of the camerawork and how bodies move through his space in it. Instead, Mr. Hou sets up the two (Arri) cameras and lets the performs work it out. If it succeeds, then that’s the shot that they use. “But if it doesn’t,” Mr. Hou explained, he “will shift the image based on what they’re working with.” He doesn’t pressure them to be “so technical” when they’re shooting, and that’s the “way he’s always worked.”

  • Cafe Lumiere Cafe Lumiere
    Homage to Yasujiro Ozu, Hou Hsiao Hsien project

    Cafe Lumiere (previous post)

  • AssayasHo-
    Olivier Assayas and Hou Hsiao Hsien (via)

    Hong Kong Democracy Movement- 2014

    September 28th, 2014
  • Oct 6 update : Legacy of Tienanman Square looms

  • Oct 5 update: news from Hong Kong..

  • Click to see large 1hongkong

    IN PICTURES: On the front lines of the Hong Kong democracy movement

  • The first tear gas fired..

  • Message from Taiwan President

  • Exciting time.. second night (see more photos).

  • In the Mood for Smiles.

    Click to see large 1antonioniChina
    Michelangelo Antonioni : Born: September 29, 1912, Ferrara, Italy

    Previous post – here

    R.I. P Yoshiko Yamaguchi/Ri-Ko-Ran – Diva of China & Japan

    September 15th, 2014
  • Wartime film idol, propaganda tool Rikoran dies at 94 Japan times

  • Japanese Actress Shirley Yamaguchi, Who Starred in ‘House of Bamboo,’ Dies at 94 (Variety)

  • Yoshiko Yamaguchi1cYamguchi

    photo via

    Shirley and Charlie 1charlieYamaguchi
    (photo via)

    Yoshiko Yamaguchi and Isamu Noguchi1IsamuYoshiko

    photo via
    See previous post

    Hollywood reporter –

    After her first marriage to Japanese-American sculptor Isamu Noguchi ended in the mid-1950s, Yamaguchi married Hiroshi Ohtaka, who was Japan’s ambassador to Burma, now Myanmar, and occasionally appeared on television. In 1974, she was elected to parliament’s Upper House as a member of the governing Liberal Democratic Party and served until 1992. She was among the contributors to a private atonement fund for Asian “comfort women” used as prostitutes for Japan’s wartime military.

  • Shanghai no Onna 1952 (youtube)

  • Caught Between China & Japan: Superstar Li Xianglan

    She called China her fatherland and Japan her motherland.

  • 1mifunescandal
    (Scandal – directed by Kurosawa)

    She was active in promoting relations with China and other Asian countries. One of her concerns was Japanese “comfort women” military brothels, an issue that still strains ties between Japan and its neighbours.

    In her 1987 autobiography, Yamaguchi wrote she was shellshocked when she watched “China Nights” to prepare the book. “Why did I have to appear in such a movie and perform as ‘Chinese actress Ri Koran (Li Xianglan)’? I felt miserable realising this at this advanced age and I had sleepless nights for months.”

    However, according to some Japanese bloggers, the movie was not widely taken as a pure propaganda film but was appreciated by many people in both Japan and China.

    “I think song is something that helps shrink boundaries and distances,” Yamaguchi told public broadcaster NHK in 1985. “I myself suffered much as I was trapped in a war between two countries as long as I remember. Therefore I am determined not to tolerate any war.” (via)

    In the Mood for Fan Ho’s Photography – Hong Kong 1950

    September 10th, 2014
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  • Fan Ho (homepage)

  • Fan Ho: finding love and light in 1950s Hong Kong – in pictures

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    Fan Ho 1fan-ho-43

    Ho Fan (Chinese: 何藩) (born October 8, 1937) is a celebrated Chinese photographer, film director and actor. He has won over 280 awards from international exhibitions and competitions worldwide since 1956 for his photography

    Director of A Simple Life, Song of the Exile, Ann Hui won Asian Filmmaker of the Year Award

    August 9th, 2014

  • Tang Wei from Golden Era directed by Ann Hui (waiting to see this film – updated May 23, 2019)

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    Ann Hui (right) received Asian Filmmaker of the Year” Award
    at Busan Film Fest

  • Ann Hui wiki

    On 23 May 1947, Ann Hui was born in Anshan, Liaoning province, Manchuria to a Chinese father and a Japanese mother. In 1952, she moved to Macau, then Hong Kong at the age of five and attended St. Paul’s Convent School. Hui then received a Masters in English and comparative literature at the University of Hong Kong until 1972 and later, studied at the London Film School for two years. Before receiving her degree, Hui studied and did her thesis on the works of Alain Robbe-Grillet, a French writer and filmmaker.

    Song of the Exile 1Annhuisong-of-the-exile click to see large
    Maggie Cheung (right)

    One of her most personal work is Song of the Exile
    is a 1990 Hong Kong-Taiwanese film, a semi-fictionalised autobiography directed by Ann Hui. It was screened in the Un Certain Regard section at the 1990 Cannes Film Festival.

  • A Simple Life 1Andy-Lau-Deanie-Ip-A-Simple-Life
    Deanie Ip and Andy Lau both won best actor/actress awards.

    Roger Ebert reivewed a Simple Life

  • A Simple Life (A very moving film.. Ann Hui’s attention to details is amazing.)

    Ann Hui has won Best Director (4 times) more than anyone else at the Hong Kong Film Awards. Deanie Ip is the oldest Best Actress recipient (64-years-old at the time of her win).

    Inspired by the true story of producer Roger Lee and his servant, the film depicts the relationship between Roger (Lau) and Sister Peach (Ip), a woman who has worked for four generations of Roger’s family.

    R.I.P Wu Tianming + Cai Guo Qiang & Bruce Lee Musical

    March 12th, 2014
  • See The King of Mask full film (youtube)

    R.I.P Wu Tianming (LA Obit)

    Wu Tianming dies at 74; Chinese director shook up state-run studio
    Chinese director Wu Tianming was considered the inspiration for the so-called Fifth Generation of innovative filmmakers in China, including Zhang Yimou and Chen Kaige.

  • Chinese artists and calligraphers on missing Malaysian Airline Flight.

  • Anti-mining and resources group Generation Alpha threaten Cai Guo-Qiang exhibition at GoMA due to Santos sponsorship

  • Bruce Lee musical (David Henry Hwang …) youtube trailer

  • Man walks 3000 miles in China.. His Before & After Photos Will Shock You. (via Lifebuzz).

    Bei Dao -An August Sleepwalker Answers

    August 2nd, 2013
  • Bei Dao (Poetry Foundation)

    Bei Dao is the nom de plume of Zhao Zhenkai, widely considered one of China’s most important contemporary authors. His poems have been translated into more than 30 languages. In English he is represented by numerous collections of poetry, fiction, and essays, including The August Sleepwalker, Old Snow, Unlock, Landscape over Zero, Midnight’s Gate, and Waves, which have been internationally acclaimed for their subtlety, innovation, and eloquence.

    Each Language Keeps the Secret Code of a Culture – Stanford edu

    In an early poem, Bei Dao wrote, “freedom is nothing but the distance/between the hunter and the hunted.”
    All too true, as he soon found out.
    Protesters once shouted his poems in Tiananmen Square, and after his exile (he had been in Berlin during the 1989 uprising),

    Photo of Bei Dao via
    Happy birthday Bei Dao.

    The poetry of Bei Dao, great page for Chinese language student

  • The Answer
    By Bei Dao

    Translated By Bonnie S. McDougall

    Debasement is the password of the base,
    Nobility the epitaph of the noble.
    See how the gilded sky is covered
    With the drifting twisted shadows of the dead.

    The Ice Age is over now,
    Why is there ice everywhere?
    The Cape of Good Hope has been discovered,
    Why do a thousand sails contest the Dead Sea?

    I came into this world
    Bringing only paper, rope, a shadow,
    To proclaim before the judgment
    The voice that has been judged:

    Let me tell you, world,
    I—do—not—believe!
    If a thousand challengers lie beneath your feet,
    Count me as number thousand and one.

    I don’t believe the sky is blue;
    I don’t believe in thunder’s echoes;
    I don’t believe that dreams are false;
    I don’t believe that death has no revenge.

    If the sea is destined to breach the dikes
    Let all the brackish water pour into my heart;
    If the land is destined to rise
    Let humanity choose a peak for existence again.

    A new conjunction and glimmering stars
    Adorn the unobstructed sky now;
    They are the pictographs from five thousand years.
    They are the watchful eyes of future generations.

  • Bei Dao returns to China (published Jan 8, 2013 – Chinese only)

    Island Etude – A Deaf Biker Cycling around Taiwan

    April 22nd, 2013
  • Biking

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    Island Etude

    Travelling is always the best way to encounter true stories. Ming-Hsang, a deaf, decided to cycle around Taiwan before graduating from the college. This film, lasting for 100 minutes, documents his trip which lasted 7 days and 6 nights. He camped at the beach of Tai-Ma-Li on the first evening, playing guitar. Although he has hearing problems, he is still very much interested in sounds. The next morning, he followed Tai-11 highway. He met a group of people filming MV at the east coastline. They also film him. The third day, he was on the Su-Hua highway, a highway notoriously difficult to conquer for cyclists. He met a Lithuanian girl at Han-Ben railway station. She missed the train to Hua-Lien. He helped her to get on her train by communication with her by pens and papers. Written by Yuwei Lin

    Once Upon a Time in China – Agnes Varda

    February 14th, 2013

    Agnes Varda photography – China

    In 1957, the People’s Republic of China was not yet recognized by the United Nations, and was closed to most foreigners.

    As beautiful as little cats.

    I felt very honored to be part of the French group invited to bring their experiences from different backgrounds to the young People’s Republic. I was determined to do the best job possible as a photographer. There was so much to discover—everything.

  • Photo by Agnes Varda

  • Cantonese Opera in pictures (guardian)
    (See 14 photos)

  • Peking Opera Blues directed by Tsui Hark – Full film.. (you can watch on youtube..)

    Peking Opera Blues

    The movie combines comedy, Hong Kong action, and serious drama with scenes involving Peking Opera. Director Tsui Hark described the film as a satire on the “Chinese ignorance of democracy.” [1] The film was nominated for six awards at the Hong Kong Film Awards including Best Actress.

  • Tsui Hark Hong Kong filmmaker/producer. was born on Feb 15.
    Born in Vietnam, moved to Hong Kong at the age of fourteen. Studied film at the University of Texas at Austin.

  • Young Bruce lee & IP Man

    December 2nd, 2012

    Bruce Lee
    Yip Man (1 October 1893 – 2 December 1972), also spelled as Ip Man,[1] and also known as Yip Kai-Man, was a Chinese martial artist.

    Tony Leung was Wong Kar-wai’s only choice to play Ip Man. Wong Kar-wai said, “I want to remove everything that Tony Leung had and shape him anew into another person.” He invited Ip Man’s final disciple Leung Siu-hung to teach Tony Leung the ways of Wing Chun. Master Leung had high praise for Leung. “To someone who has never studied martial art, Mr. Leung has a lot of potential. When you teach him a set, he understands what follows and kills three birds with one stone. He has this kind of potential and the material to learn kung fu.”
    Tony Leung’s three years of training was also unveiled for the first time in the documentary. He said, “The director and I hope through the training process to experience the personality of a true martial artist, from which to shape a master image that has both flesh and blood.” With the upcoming film release, Tony Leung said that he was not nervous. He only hoped that viewers would not watch this film with just the idea of watching an Ip Man movie, because anyone who knew Wong Kar-wai knew that he definitely had his own way to innovate and open everyone’s eyes.
    (Wong Kar Wai – net)

    (via)

  • Young Bruce Lee film trailer

    24 City – Jia Zhang Ke

    August 30th, 2012
  • 24 city

    See full film here

    The film follows three generations of characters in Chengdu (in the 1950s, the 1970s and the present day) as a state-owned factory gives way to a modern apartment complex.
    The apartment complex featured in the film is an actual development (also called “24 City”) built on the former site of an airplane engine manufacturing facility. Jia will also produce a documentary about the location.
    The film’s narrative style is described by critics as a blend of fictional and documentary storytelling, and it consist of five authentic interviews and four fictional scenes delivered by actors (but presented in a documentary format.


    Joan Chen (Photo via 24 City – Mixing and manipulating Chinese History )

    Peter Bradshaw (Guardian)

    His most sensational “fictional” interview is with a beautiful, lonely factory worker, who is nicknamed Little Flower on the shopfloor, because of her resemblance to the eponymous heroine of a popular 1980 film. The heroine of that genuine film was played by Joan Chen and this character is played by … Joan Chen. Using such an obviously famous star in my view exonerates Jia from the charge of dishonesty. It’s an extraordinarily audacious, even outrageous casting gesture, a day-glo post-modern joke amidst the dour factory dust: an alienation effect which is also its opposite, an identification effect, a way of dramatising how downtrodden factory workers dreamed of glamorous escape, of lives other than the ones they had.

    Early film – 1997

    Jia Zhang Ke photo via

    “Part of the reason I started making films was to respond to cinema’s blind spots, its silences, on the kind of life I knew. I wanted to express all the memorable things that I had experienced, and I think this is still my primary responsibility as a filmmaker.” – Jia Zhangke (MUBI)

    The quest for memory – documentary – (Senses of Cinema)