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Art Installations of Estonian artist Katja Novitskova

December 13th, 2021
  • Katja Novitskova wiki

    Katja Novitskova (born 1984 in Tallinn, Estonia) is an Estonian installation artist. She lives and works in Amsterdam and Berlin. Her work focuses on issues of technology, evolutionary processes, digital imagery and corporate aesthetics. Novitskova is interested in investigating how, “media actively redefines the world and culture, and everything”[2] related to art, nature and commerce.

    Her series of installations, pattern of activation

    Novitskova derives patterns from and expresses her works through her archives of online images, in a contemplation of our relationship with our screen based and environmental spaces. Her work is equal parts science, philosophy and an expanded approach to reading visual imagery. A perfect example of this lens is Pattern Of Activation, a series of more than five installations made by the artist over a span of six years. Her visual vocabulary is informed by her study of semiotics, culture, new media arts and graphic design in conversation with her philosophical interests. On the series Pattern Of Activation, Novitskova comments on her anthropologically and ecologically driven exploration, “I have always been interested in deep time loops. If you look at a contemporary object or emotion like an iPhone or our obsession with social media, I am always curious about the deep time origin of that activity and how it connects to our first tools of humanity or the evolutionary structures in our brains and our bodies that enable us to behave how we do today even though today’s world feels so far removed from the ancient times. We are actually really connected to the older generations, it’s not that long ago. I am always trying to be aware of this time thread and how we got here and of course the time scale of the Earth itself and our deep connection to other living creatures on it. From a jellyfish to bacteria, can be seen as a web of connections that is active today but also has this historical connection”.

  • Behind the White Glasses – Adieu Lina Wertmuller

    December 9th, 2021
  • Lina

    Italodamericano – Lina Wertmuller Oscar

  • Wki

    In general, Wertmüller’s films strongly reflect her own political commitments, with main characters who are either dedicated anarchists, communists, feminists, or all those, and the films’ main action centers on political or socioeconomic conflicts. Wertmüller self-identified as socialist.

  • Grotesque Poetry a Conversation with Lina Wertmuller

  • Witkin and Witkin – a Documentary film of Twin Artists

    December 7th, 2021
  • Review here
    Ziff has pulled off an astonishing accomplishment with Witkin and Witkin. The film works on many levels. Firstly, the viewer is drawn into the “weird news” curiosity about identical twins who go their separate ways. Then comes the compelling rush of fascination around the art they make. Finally, she delivers a tender, charming look at two very different lives of artists have gone through many experiences and relationships. It combines a sideshow with an art course and a twin biography that is exceedingly entertaining.

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    (Still Life with Mirror – Joel Peter Witkin

    Joel Peter Witkin – Heaven, Hell, Transesexuals, Deformed people (Previous post)

  • RIP – Lawrence Weiner – Conceptual, Language Artist

    December 2nd, 2021
  • At Whitney

    Lawrence Weiner

  • Marian Goodman Gallery

    In Memoriam: Lawrence Weiner

    Our fellow artist and dear friend, Lawrence Weiner, has passed at the age of 79. A force of conceptual art, Lawrence gained international recognition for the use of language as his primary medium. He proposed a new relationship to art and redefined the position of the artist, and his works demonstrated the power of language worldwide.
    “I am heartbroken.” —Marian Goodman

  • Artforum obit

    Lawrence Weiner, a towering figure in the Conceptual art movement arising in the 1960s and who profoundly altered the landscape of American art, died December 2 at the age of seventy-nine. Known for his text-based installations incorporating evocative or descriptive phrases and sentence fragments, typically presented in bold capital letters accompanied by graphic accents and occupying unusual sites and surfaces, Weiner rose to prominence among a cohort that included Robert Barry, Douglas Huebler, Joseph Kosuth, and Sol LeWitt. A firm believer that an idea alone could constitute an artwork, he established a practice that stood out for its consistent embodiment of his famous 1968 “Declaration of Intent”:

  • George Seurat – Don’t Miss his Birthay on December 2.

    December 2nd, 2021
  • George Seurat Org

    George Seurat (December 2, 1859 – March 29, 1891)

    “We realized that that painting was the setting of a play,” explained Sondheim. “All the people in that painting, when you start speculating on why none of them are looking at each other, maybe there’s a reason for that. Maybe someone was having an affair with another one, or was related to someone else.” The final question Sondheim and Lapine asked themselves before they started work: Who was missing from the painting? Sondheim and Lapine both agreed — it was the artist

  • Happy bithday Goerge Seurat (December 2)

  • David Gulpilil – The Passing of an Indigenous Actor from Australia

    November 29th, 2021

  • (Thanks to “Walkabout”, David Gulpilil became an actor/activist.)

    The Indigenous actor, who was in his late 60s when he died, helped shape the history of Australian film

    David Gulpilil a titanic force in Australian cinema dies with lung cancer.

    David Gulpilil wiki


  • (Rabbit Proof Fence – directed by Philip Noyce, cinematography by Christopher Doyle)

  • The Last Wave

    In 1969, Gulpilil’s skill as a tribal dancer caught the attention of British filmmaker Nicolas Roeg, who had come to Maningrida scouting locations for a forthcoming film. Roeg promptly cast the sixteen-year-old unknown to play a principal role in his internationally acclaimed motion picture Walkabout, released in 1971. Gulpilil’s on-screen charisma, combined with his acting and dancing skills, was such that he became an instant national and international celebrity. He travelled to distant lands, mingled with famous people, and was presented to heads of state.[1] During these travels to promote the film, he met and was impressed with John Lennon, Bob Marley, Muhammad Ali, and Bruce Lee. (Via Wiki)

    Stephen Sondheim -(March 22, 1930 – November 26, 2021)

    November 26th, 2021

  • Stephen Sondheim, Bernadette Peters and Mandy Patinkin in rehearsal for Sunday in the Park with George (1984)

  • Stephen Sondheim

    Sondheim’s best-known works as composer and lyricist include A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum (1962), Company (1970), Follies (1971), A Little Night Music (1973), Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street (1979), Sunday in the Park with George (1984), and Into the Woods (1987). He was also known for writing the lyrics for West Side Story (1957) and Gypsy (1959).

  • A must see – on youtube James Lipton interviewed Stephen Sondheim

  • BBC obit see photos of Elizabeth Taylor and Stephen Sondheim (Also Judy Dench video of singing his song)

  • The Stephen Sondheim cameo you didn’t realize was in Tick, Tick…Boom

    Stephen Sondheim’s Voice End of Tick Tick Boom

    “When I showed him the finished film, he said, ‘You treated me gently and royally, for which I’m grateful,'” says Miranda. “And then he wrote me and said, ‘But the last phone message to Jon, the language feels a little trite. I don’t feel like I would ever really say that. Can I rewrite it?’ I was like, ‘Gosh, a rewrite from Stephen Sondheim — do I accept this?'”
    There was only one problem — Whitford had already wrapped his work on the project and was unavailable to re-record it. Sondheim offered to record the new version for Miranda, and it’s his voice that audiences can hear in the final cut.
    “It makes me weep to even think about,” gushes Miranda. “Because he was such a mentor to Jon and generations of songwriters. But yes, he rewrote that message and recorded it himself and just sent it to me.”
    He’s not good, he’s not nice, he’s Stephen Sondheim.

  • Listen to 22 best “I am still here

  • Robert Bly – (December 23, 1926 – November 21, 2021)

    November 22nd, 2021
  • Things to Think

    Think in ways you’ve never thought before.
    If the phone rings, think of it as carrying a message
    Larger than anything you’ve ever heard,
    Vaster than a hundred lines of Yeats.

    Think that someone may bring a bear to your door,
    Maybe wounded and deranged; or think that a moose
    Has risen out of the lake, and he’s carrying on his antlers
    A child of your own whom you’ve never seen.

    When someone knocks on the door, think that he’s about
    To give you something large: tell you you’re forgiven,
    Or that it’s not necessary to work all the time, or that it’s
    Been decided that if you lie down no one will die.
    Robert Bly


  • A Billy Moyers – Gathering Men, Robert Bly

  • Mark Rylance How Robert Bly Changed My Life

  • Robert Bly – Poetry Foundation

  • Robert Bly wiki

  • Baseera Khan – “I Am an Archive”

    November 17th, 2021
  • Baseera K.

    Baseera Khan I am an archive – New Yorker

  • Baseera Khan homepage

  • Baseera Khan I am an Archive

  • I am a Muslim – an interview with Baseera Khan

  • Jakucho Setouchi – (15 May 1922 – 9 November 2021)

    November 12th, 2021


  • (Hagiwara Kenichi or known as Sho-Ken and Jakucho Setouchi – from the Magazine Jakucho 2009) Hagiwara Kenichi and Jakucho Setouchi were very close, she was his surrogate mother. In this magazine their trips to Yokahama and Kyoto and their daily conversation were recorded. Hagiwara Kenichi passed away a few years ago.


  • Mario Ambrosieus posted the sad news of the passing of Jakucho Setouchi at 99 years old.

    Distant Rain Jakucho Setouchi and Tess Gallahar
    (I would like to read this.)

    Distant Rain records a conversation between the eloquent American poet Tess Gallagher and the renowned Japanese novelist and Buddhist nun Jakucho Setouchi that took place in 1990 at Jakuan, Setouchi’s home temple, in Sagano, Japan.

    Gallagher had recently experienced the death of her husband, Raymond Carver, an internationally renowned short story writer. In a frank and at times humorous exchange, the two women trade observations about love and loss, and about the role of writing in coping with grief.

    Their words, reproduced in both English and Japanese, unfold accordion-style across the rich colors and striking imagery of artist Keiko Hara’s wood-block and stencil prints. Complemented by the exquisite lettering of typographer Maki Yamashita and under the guidance of master bookbinder Atsuo Ikuta, Distant Rain is not only a moving tribute to the sustaining power of love but also a stunning example of the art of book design


    (For Hagiwara Kenichi, the last time he visited Ten Ryu Mon in Kyoto was 25 years ago)

    Dean Stockwell -Delicate to Delirium – RIP Nov 7 2021

    November 9th, 2021

    Life in pictures Dean Stockwell

    Dean Stockwell wiki

    Great interview here – all about Dean Stockwell (by Michael Buckley
    Films in Review, January 1985)

    “Cannes is a good place for me,” claims Dean Stockwell, shortly after PARIS, TEXAS (one of his two new pictures) won the Grand Prize at the 1984 Cannes Film Festival. He has twice shared acting honors at Cannes, with Bradford Dillman and Orson Welles for Compulsion (1959) and with Ralph Richardson, Katherine Hepburn and Jason Robards, Jr. in Long Day’s Journey Into Night (1962). And it was there that he met his wife, Joy: “It was in 1976, at one o’clock in the morning, on the beach in front of the Carlton Hotel.” Says Stockwell: “Between Paris, Texas and Dune (in which he plays Dr. Yueh), I think I’ve got a pretty good start on what amounts to a third career.”

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    (Dean Stockwell photo by Dennis Hopper)

    “Long Day’s Journey Into Night,” states Stockwell, “was as intense and rewarding an experience as I’ve had. It’s a small cast, and one of the greatest plays of the century by one of the greatest American playwrights. We rehearsed it six weeks with a brilliant director, Sidney Lumet. I feel that the film is the best American film made from a play – that I’ve ever seen. There was no screenplay. Some cuts were made to make it feasible for a film – but nothing was transposed. It was very gratifying.”
    In the book, Kate, by Charles Higham, Sidney Lumet is quoted: “Dean would come in with a bottle of vodka, and Kate at first almost did what she did to him in the movie – struck him. She was so angry at him – out of love. But she was tender to him. The first day of work was cold, and he had forgotten to bring an overcoat. The next day, there was a coat in his dressing room; she had gone out after shooting and bought him one. She always had an enormous affinity for heavy drinkers – maybe because of Tracy.”

  • 1aaacompulsion

    Darrow was the inspiration for the character of Johnathan Wilk in the 1956 novel Compulsion, a thinly fictionalized account of the Leopold and Loeb case. In 1959, the novel was adapted into a film of the same name, starring the legendary filmmaker Orson Welles as Wilk. Welles, whose closing monologue was the longest ever committed to film at that time, shared the Best Actor award with co-stars Bradford Dillman and Dean Stockwell.

    Compulsion (1959)

    Dean Stockwell made three remarkable films in his mid-career starting with Compulsion followed by Sons and Lovers and Long Day’s Journey into Night.


  • Sons and Lovers

    Of Sons and Lovers, Stockwell maintains, “It’s a classic film. It holds up – over a long period of time. It had a brilliant cast, and I feel it was a pretty damn good rendition of that book.” Sons and Lovers headed the National Board of Review’s 10 Best Films of 1960 list. It tied with The Apartment as the NY Film Critics Best Film. In his FIReview, Henry Hart wrote: “Rarely has so honest and meaningful a novel been turned into so good a motion picture.” He noted, “Stockwell does things . . . an actor twice his age would be proud of,” and added, “I think the thing about his performance that fascinated me most was his seemingly spontaneous use of bits of business which seemed to come . . . from his feeling for the character.”

  • The O’Neill classic, says Stockwell, “remains one of my favorite films. And Paris, Texas is certainly another. The film was put together and shot in a most unusual way. Sam Shepard, probably our leading playwright right now, wrote the screenplay. But, as we started, it was simply a synopsis, a breakdown of scenes – with no dialogue at all. At the time, Sam was shooting Country, which opened the New York Film Festival. Everyday, when he got through acting, he would type out dialogue for Paris, Texas.” (Interview with Dean Stockwell)

    Dean Stockwell dean-stockwell in Blue Velvet

    Dean Stockwell, Blue Velvet – It’s not easy to out-bizarre your fellow cast members in a David Lynch movie, but Dean Stockwell managed to do just that in his one-scene turn as Frank Booth’s (Dennis Hopper) unctuous, kabuki-faced, satin-jacketed mentor in malevolence, Ben. The mellow yin to Hopper’s manic yang, Stockwell’s eerie lip-synching rendition of Roy Orbison’s “In Dreams” just barely hints at what lies inside the depraved mind of the drug dealer/pimp. (via)

    “I hate to admit it, but you can’t do a role unless it’s somewhere in your psyche. People don’t realize how vast the subconscious is. It’s like infinity.” Dean Stockwell.

    Albert Camus The Plague, Leonard Cohen & Joni Mitchell – Nov 7 2021

    November 7th, 2021
  • William Hurt and Sandrine Bonniare in Plague (youtube)

    Albert Camus

    Camus albertmaria and Maria Casarès

    Camus and his women

    Camus had met Maria Casares, later star of Cocteau’s Orpheus but already an established actress, in 1944. Daughter of a rich Spanish Republican, a refugee from Franco, she was a passionate, wilful, intelligent woman. She was probably the only one of his lovers who had a relationship of equality with him. In addition, Todd says, ‘If he was a Don Juan, she was a Don Juana’.

  • (Albert Camus and Viggo Mortensen)
    Far from Men Viggo Mortensen

  • Leonard Cohen archive (Cohen died on Nov 7,2016.)

    Happy birthday Joni Mitchell
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