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Bad Timing, The Significance of Nicolas Roeg’s Passing


  • Nicolas Roeg passed away – (Tributes from Donald Sutherland, Duncan Jones etc)

    BBC obit

    Nicolas Roeg was one of the most original film-makers the UK has ever produced.
    His early experience as a cinematographer brought a stunning visual quality to his work.

  • (Best obit – read here)

  • The Alchemy of Nicolas Roeg (Dan Fox) (Frieze II)

    His work sits closer to that of Derek Jarman, Peter Greenaway, Andrea Arnold, Sally Potter, Steve McQueen and other British art house directors, than the storytelling of Lean, Lester, Schlesinger, and other directors he cut his teeth with.

    Nicolas Roeg in conversation (Frieze I)

    Film director Nicolas Roeg talks to his friend, the artist John Stezaker, about collage, editing and memory, and film’s ability to ‘trap shadows’

  • BAD TIMING, Art Garfunkel, Theresa Russell, director Nicolas Roeg on set, 1980, (c) World Northal

    Obit from his close friend and a producer Jeremy Thomas

    (see Theresa Russell playing Marilyn here )- Look Now, the significance of Nicolas Roeg (previous post)


  • Thanks to “Walkabout”, David Gulpilil became an actor/activist, and the kid who is not in this photo was Nicolas Roeg’s son).

  • 1NickBowie
    (Filming The Man Who Fell to Earth)
    The documentary of the Man Who Fell to Earth – 2017 here.


  • (Julie Christie in Don’t Look Now, and Roeg was a cinematographer for Far From the Madding Crowd, Farenheidt 451 and Petulia (Richard Lester)

  • Don’t Look Now – a review + interviews here.

  • In all of his films Nicolas Roeg shows what happens when characters from different cultures intersect. From Performance (gangster meets rock star) to Walkabout (abandoned white children saved by Aborigine on his walkabout) to The Man Who Fell to Earth (alien crashing on Earth needs to return to his home planet) this intersection forms the core dramatic element of his films.

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