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Remembering Chantal Akerman on her birthday June, 6 – 2017

June 6th, 2017
  • 1akermanspoltight

    via Spotlight

    Each year Sight & Sound updates their list of ‘The Top 50 Greatest Films of All Time’. The huge jury of critics, programmers and academics came to the grand total of 846 while the number of films by female directors they chose was… 1.

    JEANNE DIELMAN, 23 QUAI DU COMMERCE 1080 BRUXELLES (1975) directed by Chantal Akerman –

    Chantal Akerman was only 25 when she made this film (the same age that Welles made CITIZEN KANE in fact).

  • 1AkermanRetrospectiv
    Chantal Akerman, at the 1982 Venice Film Festival, where she presented her romantic and choreographic masterwork “Toute une Nuit.”

    Photograph by Raymond Depardon / Magnum
    New Yorker (A Chantal Akerman Retrospective)

  • William Hurt 1acouchinNY
    (A Couch in NY)

    Chantal Akerman’s Point of View..

  • R.I.P Chantal Akerman, Stopped Breathing, Her Films Live Forever

    October 6th, 2015

  • Aurore Clement in Rendez Vous D’Anna (youtube)

    Chantal Akerman: a director with a rare creative vision (Guardian obit)

    Shocking news, so sad that Chantal Akerman died at 65.

    Directors like Todd Haynes, Sally Potter and Michael Haneke have credited Ms. Akerman as a major influence. J. Hoberman, a former film critic for The Village Voice, likened her to Mr. Godard and to the German director Rainer Werner Fassbinder, once calling her “arguably the most important European director of her generation.”

    Mr. Mazzanti recalled asking Ms. Akerman how she had edited “Hotel Monterey,” a silent film about a Lower Manhattan hotel that she had made in 1972. “She said, ‘I was breathing, and then at one point I understood it was the time to cut. It was my breathing that decided the length of my shots,’ ” he said. “That’s Chantal Akerman. She breathed through the films,” he said. “She was cinema.”

    Obit BFI

  • Chantal Akerman archive here. (Chantal introduced me to Pina, her documentaries were superb)

  • Senses of Cinema – La Bas the Suspended Image and the Politics of Anti-messianism.

  • Chantal Akerman Retrospective (Chantal Akerman: extraordinary artist of the everyday who we will miss for ever)

  • La Captive (bath scene on youtube)

  • 1ackerman

    photo letters home 1986

    See more photos here.

    Indiwire obit
    Her wiki

    Update: Remembering Chantal (Artforum)

    Chantal Akerman at 64 – 2014

    June 5th, 2014

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    Chantal Akerman (Mubi)

    One of the boldest cinematic visionaries of the past quarter century, the film-school dropout Chantal Akerman takes a profoundly personal and aesthetically idiosyncratic approach to the form, using it to investigate geography and identity, space and time, sexuality and religion.

    Don’t Miss Chantal Akerman’s Study of Pina Bausch at Lincoln Center

    What Akerman can’t express in words, she makes piercingly specific with her images.

    One Day Pina Asked me (video)

    Divine Delphine Seyrig as Jeanne Dielman

    Colin Marshall..

    Jeanne Dielman understands what all the best works of cinema do: implication and occurrence are two different things. Where so many mediocre films deal in visual shorthand that merely suggests to us that certain events have happened, this one has its events actually take place. That this builds their importance far beyond any quick-cut battle for the very future of humanity might point toward an answer to the feminist question: these are domestic duties we’re watching, and the film treats them with a gravity that somehow goes beyond aesthetics. You could call its story tragic, but just by existing it demonstrates an artistic fact that’s sadder than anything going on in its content. By letting its content dictate its form — or rather, by letting its content and form exist in symbiosis — the film achieves what most films could if they did the same. But almost no film does.

    Google mapping Jeanne Dielman 23 Quai de Commerce 1080 Bruxelles

  • Click to see large

    La Captive
    Here was a review by Hoberman (scroll down)

    Chantal Akerman’s La Captive is another sort of psycho-epistemological inquiry that asks: How can we know another?

  • Aurore Clement in Rendez Vous D’Anna (youtube)


  • (image via)

  • Previous post (D’est, her photographs exhibition, Pina Bausch on youtube etc)

    Chantal Akerman

    May 6th, 2008

    Chantal Akerman:Moving Through Time and Space at MIT List Visual Art Center –
    May 2 – July 6, 2008

    east3

    Chantal Akerman retraces a journey from the end of summer to deepest winter, from East Germany, across Poland and the Baltics, to Moscow. (via)

    D’est on youtube

    chantal1

    From the Other Side is an unsentimental look at the plight of illegal Mexican immigrants as they attempt the dangerous crossing from Agua Prieta in Sonora, Mexico, to Douglas, Ariz. (Via)

    Last month Marian Goodman gallery (New York) exhibited Chantal Akerman’s photographs. (Chantal’s main audience is from museums, galleries and film societies.)

    The first time I was introduced to Chantal Akerman’a work was her documenatary film on Pina Bausch.
    (An Italian version of this film is cut awkwardly in 6 parts, now provided on youtube).


    Part I here

    Other samples of film clips from youtube:
    “Jeanne Dielmain”

    Hotel Monterey (1972) Akerman – passage (Glenn Gould Bach aria is added to the silent film footage on Youtube)

    A Couch in New York – trailer (Chantal’s most accessible film starring Juliet Binoche and William Hurt)

    A week ago I decided to see “La Captive” starring my favorite actress Sylvie Testud.
    Here was a review by Hoberman (scroll down)

    Chantal Akerman’s La Captive is another sort of psycho-epistemological inquiry that asks: How can we know another?

    Visual as La Captive is in its rigorously formal compositions, the filmmaker is straightforwardly concerned with language. She filters her Proust through the old nouveau roman of Duras or Robbe-Grillet to fixate on recurring phrases: “au contraire,” “if you like,” “you think so?” Similarly, Akerman takes situations from Proust and elaborately defamiliarizes them.

    More films by Chantal Akerman by Acquarello