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Prankster Poet Painter Picabia’s Perpetual Movement – Francis Picabia at MoMa

November 22nd, 2016
  • Dada Picabia 1adadapicabia

    Picabia at MoMa..

  • Francis Picabia – 22 January 1879 – November 30, 1953

    Poet, painter, self-described funny guy, idiot, failure, pickpocket, and anti-artist par excellence, Francis Picabia was a defining figure in the Dada movement; indeed, André Breton called Picabia one of the only “true” Dadas.

  • Picabia

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    Daughter Born without Mother
    1916-18

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    L’oeil Cacodylate, 1921

    Google Picabia

    I Am A Beautiful Monster
    Who is with me is against me.

  • Duchamp, Beatrice Wood 1adadabeatricewconeyisland at Coney Island

    “Entr’acte,” the avant-garde film he made in 1924 with René Clair, and his contentious series of figurative paintings from the ’20s, ’30s and ’40s. Borrowing from art history, soft-core pornography and commercial art, they presage Pop Art, appropriation art and Neo-Expressionism.

  • Perpetual Movement 1adadapi

    “Our Heads Are Round So Our Thoughts Can Change Direction” is a Picabia aphorism consistent with another one: “The only movement is perpetual movement.” The show has a propulsive, joyous energy. Something new, different and often challenging waits in nearly every gallery.

    Dada is like your hopes: nothing like your paradise: nothing like your idols: nothing like your heroes: nothing like your artists: nothing like your religions: nothing

    Previous post

    Boneyard and Butterfly – Nabokov/November 2016

    November 16th, 2016
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    Boneyard, 1990 by Christian Marclay
    hydrostone casts of telephone receivers, in 750 parts
    dimensions variable

    Nabakov -vladimir-nabokov_3

    Here something interesting to read about Nabokov -

    Name these children album..

    Velázquez Portraits: Truth in Painting at the Met – Nov 4, 2016 – Mar, 2017

    November 4th, 2016
  • Velázquez Portraits: Truth in Painting at the Met
    November 4, 2016–March 12, 2017

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    Diego Velázquez – Self Portrait, 1645 (Uffizi)

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    Velazquez Artchive

    In the earliest portrait of Felipe Prospero, the prince rests his hand on the chair, symbol of royal status and power. In that chair, a sweet dog rests happily. Arthur C. Danto, the already cited professor of philosophy from Columbia, comments:

    “Given the chair in the rigid semiotics of courtly etiquette in Spain, something is being conveyed beyond the fact that spoiled dogs climb into furniture in which courtiers would not dare to sit. Some metaphysical joke? Or the suggestion that dogs hold some rank in nature higher than slaves or even courtiers: All I know is that a dog in a chair is not innocent naturalism.”

  • 1ad-pareja

    Pareja, his mulatto slave whom he had taught to paint. In it, he endowed Juan, whom he freed, with a majestic presence, adorning him with a fancy lace collar, a luxurious form of adornment forbidden by the sumptuary laws of the time, especially to someone of his social category.

  • Previous post1adwarf

  • 1adhamilton

    Picasso’s Meninas by Richard Hamilton

    Google Velasquez velasquez

  • A portrait Mark&Velasquez of Philip IV by Velázquez and Mark Z. (Photo collage by Toni Dalton)

  • Seven Things to know about Spike Jonze’s “Her”

    October 22nd, 2016
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    Installation by Jurgen Trautwein

  • J.Phoenix from Her 1ajp

  • 7 Things To Know About Spike Jonze’s ‘Her’

    1. “Her” is dedicated to the memories of actor James Gandolfini, author Maurice Sendak, cinematographer Harris Savides and musician-filmmaker Adam Yauch. (All four had worked with Jonze in some capacity over the last 20 years.)

    2. Two former “Saturday Night Live” cast members have their voices featured in “Her,” as does one of Jonze’s “Adaptation” co-stars. (These surprises are better left unspoiled without any further specifics.)

    3. Samantha Morton, who voiced Samantha during the film’s production and was replaced by Johansson after principal photography wrapped, is credited as an associate producer on the movie.

    “Every movie I’ve worked on takes a long time to find what it is, and that was part of the process of this movie finding what it was,” Jonze said when asked about the impetus behind the actress switch. “I’m hesitant to answer that question, because what Samantha brought to the movie by being with us on set was huge. What she gave me in the movie, and what she gave Joaquin in the movie, off camera, was huge. I think what Scarlett gave to the movie was also huge. I would rather leave it at that.”

    4. Chris Cooper, who was cut from the film altogether, is thanked in the end credits. So, too, are Catherine Keener, Nicole Holofcener, Bennett Miller and Steven Soderbergh, among others. As Mark Harris revealed in the recent New York Magazine cover story on “Her,” Jonze asked Soderbergh to put together his own cut of the film, though the final edit belonged to Jonze and his editors, Eric Zumbrunnen and Jeff Buchanan.

    5. “The Moon Song,” an original track that Karen O wrote for the film’s soundtrack, is sung onscreen by Johansson with backup from Phoenix. (Karen O’s version plays in the credits.)

    6. Jonze said he met with the design team behind The High Line, an elevated park on Manhattan’s West Side, to discuss the futuristic look of his film. He also revealed that he was inspired by the colors at Jamba Juice.

    7. Woody Allen was a big influence on the film’s script. “One of the movies I watched when I was writing [‘Her’] was ‘Crimes and Misdemeanors,’ because that script is so incredibly written,” Jonze explained. “There’s a lot of talking about the idea of what the movie is about, but mostly the characters are plowing through the story, and taking you through the story, with their decisions. That was really inspiring.”

  • Film still from “Her” 1aher
    Happy birthday Spike Jonze

    Final Portrait – Geoffrey Rush as Giacometti, Directed by Stanley Tucchi

    October 9th, 2016
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    (Photo by Robert Doisneau)

    Interview (see photos of Giacometti by Brassai, Cartier Bresson, Rene Burri, Robert Doisneau, Irving Penn, Arnold Newman, Man Ray, and Gordon Parks.

    Beckett and Giacometti
    (repost – Beckett archive here)

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    Monica Vitti and Antonioni looking at Giacometti sculptures.

  • Goeffrey Rush as Giacometti 1aagiacorush

    Geoffrey Rush to star in Stanley Tucci’s new film, ‘Final Portrait.

  • Jean Genet jeangenet by Giacometti

  • Robert Indiana – Imperial Love Installed in Berlin

    September 13th, 2016
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    Wall and Love 1amercaindiana-wall-love-double-sided

    Imperial Love installed at Berlin

    From Tuesday, 13 September 2016 – the artist’s birthday – visitors arriving at the entrance to the Hamburger Bahnhof – Museum für Gegenwart – Berlin will be greeted by Robert Indiana’s large-scale sculpture, Imperial LOVE (1966/2006).

    Whitney (Beyond Love)

    isamunblack4
    Photo by Fung Lin Hall

    Love in Hebrew installed in Jerusalem Noguchi Garden (Previous post)

    See a better photo of Ahava

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    Photo by Fung Lin Hall (Scottsdale, Arizona)

  • How Love nearly ruined Robert Indiana’s career (mental floss)

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    Happy birthday Robert Indiana! his wiki here

    East Meets West – Tseng Kwong Chi the Improbable Pilgrim

    September 10th, 2016
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    and Tseng Kwong Chi

    My mirrored glasses give
    the picture a neutral
    impact and a surrealistic
    quality I am looking for.
    I am an inquisitive traveler,
    a witness of my time, and
    an ambiguous ambassador.
    Tseng Kwong Chi
    1950-1990

  • Revisiting the Twin tower with Tseng Kwong Chi 1ketsengtwin

  • Tseng and Herman Costa, Aids Memrorial (Photos of Eleven Good Men)
    Tseng was 39 when he died.

    See him at Grand Canyon

    His imagery was always the curious, blank Chinese tourist. I would say to Kwong that you don’t fool me, I know, I can sense protest when I see it… this blankness was the way in which this culture at large expected him, as an Asian man, to exist. So he became a kind of a cipher, a smooth surface that because it was so impenetrable, this persona, it reflected everything!

    Bill T. Jones

    [TSENG’s work is like] a cross between Ansel Adams and Cindy Sherman.

    Timothy Greenfield-Sanders

    Bernie Sanders & Burlington Snow – a Poem by Allen Ginsberg

    September 7th, 2016
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    See Allen Ginsberg’s Handwritten Poem For Bernie Sanders, “Burlington Snow” (1986)

    Ginsberg blog

    Bernie and Allen 1allenberniecartoon

  • With his big brother 1berniechild

    Happy birthday Bernie Sanders!

    Photos via

  • 1aAndrewBonheler
    via Andrew Bonheler
    See previous post on Bernie Sanders (Contempt for Voters, theater of cruelty, undemocratic primary of 2016.

  • Martin Buber. I and thou.

    “The real struggle is not between East and West, or capitalism and communism, but between education and propaganda.”
    ― Martin Buber

    “An animal’s eyes have the power to speak a great language.”
    ― Martin Buber
    Sparrow Impromptu in Portland – Hilarious Falcon Flying from Bosnia to Syria – War and Peace Spring of 2016

    Casper David Friedrich – Chalk Cliffs on Rügen – His Recollection of the Artist’s Honeymoon

    September 5th, 2016
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    Chalk Cliffs on Rügen

    c. 1818
    Oil on canvas, 90,5 x 71 cm
    Oskar Reinhart Collection, Winterthur

    The painting was painted in recollection of the artist’s honeymoon.

    Caspar David Friedrich (5 September 1774 – 7 May 1840)

    Perspective

    One of the unexpectedly important things that art can do for us is teach us how to suffer. It can do so by evoking scenes that are dark, melancholy or painful, and that normalise and lend dignity to the suffering we may ourselves be experiencing in isolation and confusion. They reveal – with grandeur and technical skill – that grief belongs to the human condition.

    Caspar David Friedrich, a painter of sublime sadness, was born in 1774 in Greifswald, an ancient trading town in the far north of Germany, on the Baltic coast. It was a beautiful place in a severe, northern sort of way. As a child he loved the way the pinnacles, spires and towers of the town loomed up above the trees in the haze of very early summer mornings.

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    Trauerszene am Strand

    Matisse Stories by A.S. Byatt + Mark Rylance, K. Scott Thomas in Angels & Insects

    August 24th, 2016
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    Happy birthday A.S. Byatt

    Mark Rylance 1Angels&Insects and Kristin Scott Thomas in Angels and Insects

    See a trailer here (youtube)

  • THe Children’s Books (youtube)

  • Paris review – interview

    A.S. Byatt’s essay on Sigmar Polke

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    Sigmar Polke
    Anyone Can Have Out-of-Body Experiences at Will 2002
    Mixed media on fabric, 302 X 403 cm
    Courtesy Michael Werner, New York and Cologne © Sigmar Polke

    Sausages and potatoes, fairytale images and the dots of newspaper photographs – Sigmar Polke explores modern reality through an extraordinary range of imagery. The novelist A.S. Byatt sings his praises

    Mary, Marcel, Man Ray, Chris Marker & Penn for Photography Day – 2016

    August 19th, 2016
  • Mary Reynolds 1aaDuchampMaryReynolds and Marcel Duchamp
    photo by Man Ray.

  • Jean Cocteau by Man Ray 1cocteauManRay

    See Jean Cocteau by Irving Penn and others by Penn.

    Photo by Irving Penn -Two Guedras, Morocco, 1971 1aIMoroccopenn_ss10

  • Chris Marker 1aChrisMarker2-660 and Alain Resnais
    (Click to see previous posts on Marker and Resnais)

  • 11 Things I Learned from the Hieronymus Bosch – by David Byrne

    August 9th, 2016

    11 Things I Learned from the Hieronymus Bosch – by David Byrne

    5. He was among the first to paint what he imagined
    Bosch was considered among the first to paint things that were wholly out of his imagination. Previously there were standard demons as described in the Bible and elsewhere, but his figures went beyond that. His landscapes were fictional, too—a conflation of traditional Dutch elements and imagined versions of somewhat spectacular Middle Eastern holy lands.

  • 7. Humanity is, for the most part, wretched

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    Hieronymus Bosch painted sheet music on man’s butt and now you can hear it.

  • Hieronymous Bosch Hieronymous Bosch detail from the Garden of Earthly Delights
    Detail from The Garden of Earthly Delights

    Previous post – Porcille and Earthly Delight

  • Hieronymus Bosch: The Wayfarer, circa 1500–1510
    Hieronymus Bosch: The Wayfarer, circa 1500–1510

    The Mystery of Hieronymus Bosch by Ingrid D. Rowland