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Claude Cahun – Surrealist Identity Performance

May 19th, 2017
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    A conceptual artist pays homage to surrealist Claude Cahun (Hyperallergic)

    Born to an intellectual Jewish family in Nantes in 1894, Lucy Schwob changed her name to Claude Cahun around 1914, then moved to Paris and stripped herself of any gender-defining qualities. She shaved her head and began exploring her various “selves” in front of the camera, donning wigs, masks, and, sometimes, an incredibly bronzed fake tan.

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    120mm x 94mm (whole)107mm x 82mm (image)Neg

  • See more here (the Redlist)

  • Immersive Exhibit “Arcades” Brings Walter Benjamin Back to Life -2017

    May 11th, 2017
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    Benjamin’s passport photograph from 1928 – courtesy of the Walter Benjamin Archiv, Berlin.
    Photo via

  • New Yorker(Walter Benjamin’s Unfinished Magnum Opus Revisited)

    Take a Stroll Through Philosopher Walter Benjamin’s Brain at New NY Exhibit

    ‘It’s like the Talmud, there is commentary and sub-commentary’
    Take a stroll through philosopher Walter Benjamin’s brain at new NY exhibit
    His tragic death in the Holocaust cut short the Jewish thinker’s 1,000 page opus.
    Through August 6, the Jewish Museum in New York’s immersive exhibit ‘Arcades’ brings it to life

  • Berlin Benjamin1 Childhood
    Name these children (arcade on FB)

  • Walter Benjamin (W.B for dummies on youtube)

  • Port Bou benjaminportpu
    Border crossing resting place

    On Truth
    Nothing is poorer than a truth expressed as it was thought. Committed to writing in such cases, it is not even a bad photograph. Truth wants to be startled abruptly, at one stroke, from her self-immersion, whether by uproar, music or cries for help. Walter Benjamin

  • The Story Teller by Walter Benjamin (Guardian Review)

  • A R Penck German Neo Expressionist Dies at 77

    May 4th, 2017
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    The Start of the Lion Hunt – at the gallery

    A R Penck dies

    German artist A. R. Penck has died, aged 77. The artist and his work personified Germany’s division during the Cold War.

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    With James Lee Byers

  • See his art at Arnet

    Close tie with Immendorf (scroll down)

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    Via

  • Question Everything, – Performance to Architecture, Vito Acconci Dies at 77

    April 28th, 2017
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    Performance Test (1969)

  • Vito Acconci homepage

    His wiki

    Vito Dies at 77 (art news)

    Vito Hannibal Acconci (January 24, 1940 – April 28, 2017)[2] was an American designer, landscape architect, performance and installation artist.

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    (Saw this at the gallery in Soho).

    Question everything

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    digital image
    Portrait from the artwork Veto Vito by Jonathan Harris.

    “My early work nearly ruined my career,” Vito told Harris by email, “and also nearly killed me,” he told later him in person. “What does a body artist do as a body grows old? It seemed necessary to find a new direction.”
    In the mid-1970s, Acconci stopped doing performances, and turned to architecture, to which he’s been committed ever since.

    Bric a Bra (links to his giant bra installation)

    or see it here

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    Hannah Weiner, Scott Burton, Anne Waldman, Vito Acconi, Bernadette Mayer, Eduardo Costa and John Perreault, NYC, 1969
    photo via

  • Google Vito Acconci

    Magnificent Polish Artist Magdalena Abakanowicz died at 86,

    April 21st, 2017
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    Magdalena Abakanowicz died at 86.
    See another photo of her from Daily News Obit here.

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    Hess Collection

    From quite early in her life, Abakanowicz has held a deep regard for the rough stalwartness of the Polish peasant culture and the utilitarian weaving done by Polish women.
    “The fiber I use in my works derives from plants and is similar to that from which we ourselves are composed…our heart is surrounded by the coronary plexus, the most vital of threads…handling fiber we handle mystery. When the biology of our body breaks down the skin has to be cut so as to give access to the inside. Later it has to be sewn on like fabric. Fabric is our covering and attire, made with our hands it is a record of our thought.”
    There is also an intriguing dichotomy in most of Abakanowicz’s work, one involving the powerful contrast between organic vitality and death. The wood trunks from the cycle War Games, for instance, invoke images of both victim and weapon, as the impoverished tree has been sculpted to resemble the axe that hewed it.

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    (Standing Mutants, 1992-1994 © Magdalena Abakanowicz, photo: by Jan Kosmowski)

    Magdalena Abakanowicz:Crowd and Individual

  • From France to Sedona Arizona, Max Ernst, Leonora Carrington & Dorothea Tanning

    April 5th, 2017
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    Photo by Herman Landshoff – Max Ernst in New York 1942 (Guggenheim collection)
    Max Ernst fled Europe helped by his marriage to Peggy Guggenheim. He left his girlfrind Leonora Carrington and she suffered a major mental breakdown.

    Max had a terrific reputation for his beauty, charm, and success with women. He had white hair and big blue eyes and a handsome beak-like nose resembling a bird’s. He was exquisitely made – ( from Peggy Guggenheim’s Out of this Century).

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    Leonora with Max Ernst and Paul Eluard Photo by Lee Miller

    Leonora Carrington (April 6 was her birthday)

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    Max with Lee and Man Ray.
    (Via)

  • Dorothea Tanning and Max Ernst in Sedona Arizona.

    James Rosenquist – Pop Artist with Blue-Color Charm dies at 83

    April 1st, 2017
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    Mr. Rosenquist’s paintings rarely contained overt political messages, but his best-known work, the enormous “F-111” (1964-5), was a protest against American militarism.

    NYtimes James Rosenquist, Pop Art Pioneer, Dies at 83

    Miami Hearald obit

    Pop Art giant James Rosenquist’s work influenced generations from New York to Miami

    His Studio

    1artRosenquist show

    Slideshow

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    The Bird of Paradise Approaches the Hot Water Planet (Grisaille), 1989.

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    Tumbledweed 1963-66

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    Via Russ Blaise

    William Acquavella, the New York art dealer, said that Mr. Rosenquist lost a significant amount of work in the fire.
    “He just rebounded from it,” he said. “Another guy would have had a tougher time bouncing back. But he enjoyed working, he enjoyed creating things, and he enjoyed painting.”
    Mr. Rosenquist also had homes in Bedford, N.Y., and Miami. Recently, he had been spending most of his time in New York City, Ms. Thompson said.
    In 2009, Mr. Rosenquist published an autobiography, “Painting Below Zero: Notes on a Life in Art,” written with David Dalton. Reviewing it in The New York Times, Dwight Garner called it “a ruddy and humble book, lighted from within by the author’s plainspoken, blue-collar charm.”

    Forrest Bess, Bruce Nauman & Robert Smithson from The Menil Houston Collection

    March 28th, 2017
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    Forrest Bess, American, 1911 – 1977
    The Hermaphrodite, 1957
    Oil on canvas

    See more Forrest Bess (previous post including a video)

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    Bruce Nauman American, born 1941,
    Untitled, 1965
    Fiberglas, polyester resin, and neon tubing

    Poking Around Wittgenstein + Bruce Nauman (from Wittgenstein archive)

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    Robert Smithson American, 1938 – 1973
    Christ Series: Christ in Limbo, 1961
    Ink and gouache on paper

    Robert Smithson died in Amarillo Texas (previous post)

  • Edward Weston & the Photos of Real America, Tina Modotti, Robinson Jeffers, Cats, Fish Gourds etc.

    March 24th, 2017
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    EDWARD WESTON, “Three Fish-Gourds (Juguetes)”, 1926, silver print, printed ca. 1935-40, 8″ x 10” (via)

    Edward Weston (1886 – 1958)

    Weston was born in Highland Park, Illinois on March 24, 1886.

    His homepage here.

  • Real American Places: Edward Weston and Leaves of Grass (See great photos from here)

  • See photos of Charis Wilson (his model & muse)here.

  • EDWARD WESTON Mary (on Clock), 1945

    See more great cat photos by Weston here.

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    Tina Modotti and Edward Weston, “Anniversary”, Mexico, 1924. Photographer unknown

    Edward Weston the Lover

    It was more than his personal charm that attracted women. His ability to write, something he often considered a shortcoming, was magical as well. Consider this response from Tina Modotti to a letter he had written,

    Once more I have been reading your letter and as at every other time my eyes are full of tears – I have never realized before that a letter – a mere sheet of paper could be such a spiritual thing – could emanate so much feeling – you gave a soul to it! If I could be with you now at this hour I love so much, I would try to tell you how much beauty has been added to my life lately! When may I come over? I am waiting for your call.

  • The nude backs of Edward Weston (social/history blog)

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    Portrait of Robinson Jeffers by Weston

  • Photo of Oscar Wilde by Sugimoto, Happy St Patrick’s Day – 2017

    March 17th, 2017
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    Eileen Gray the Irish Designer

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    Sinead O’Connor photo by Jane Bown

  • Oscar Wilde 1aHiroshiOscarwilde

    Photo by Hiroshi Sugimoto (via)


  • quotes

  • Frank McCourt

  • High Hopes in Ireland (see Irish art here)

    Breakfast on Pluto

    The wind that shakes the Barley

    Happy St Patrick’s day!

    Instinctive & Mysterious Painter Howard Hodgkin Died at 84

    March 9th, 2017
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  • Howard Hidgkin Quicksilver Colorist dies at 84 (Art News)

  • Howard Hodgkin died

    Sir Howard Hodgkin, regarded as one of Britain’s greatest contemporary painters, has died aged 84.

    <> <> <> <> Howard Hodgkins

    Hodgkin paints fairly reclusively, on several paintings in parallel, most of which take years to complete. (from Rodcorp)

    Do you have a Hodgkin painting? Mine is in the bathroom on top of small stack of Japanese books – two by Kawabata Yasunari. I was not thinking of Hodgkin when I painted this.

    <> <> <> <> Bathroom Howard Hodgekin by Fung-Lin Hall
    (Photo by Fung Lin Hall)

    (Repost)

    2006 interview –

    There is something about his work, something so delicate and instinctive and mysterious, but also so direct and simple and intense, that talking about it will not help anyone to see his paintings better. From I Hate Painting – Guardian, Colm Toibin’s interview)

    But I work in a country where I think that if I didn’t talk about my work at all people might not even bother to look at it.
    Howard Hodgkin

    A perfect example of Hodgkin’s sharp personality is the small You Are My Sunshine, which, like a sycophant’s true feelings, contains a snide black core within effusive, almost hyper orange and yellow. (The Color of Turmoil by Ana Finel Honigman)

    Colour is, of course, what characterises a Hodgkin painting. Seductive and jewel-like, it is never simply there for its own sake. In this he belongs to a distinctively European tradition, with the French post-impressionists Édouard Vuillard and Pierre Bonnard, and with Henri Matisse. As Susan Sontag pointed out, he is mindful of the ancient quarrel between Michelangelo’s preference for disegno over Titian’s for colore. It is as though he wants, she said, “to give colore its most sumptuous exclusive victory”. (Living Color - Sue Hubbard)

    Happy Girls Day in Japan – March 3 is Hinamatsuri Day – 2017

    March 3rd, 2017
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    Dolls trailer (Directed by Takeshi Kitano, Poland gave this the best film award – costume design by Yoji Yamamoto)

    Name these girls – Happy Hinamatsuri ablum

    Google Hinamatsuri

    The custom of displaying dolls began during the Heian period. Formerly, people believed the dolls possessed the power to contain bad spirits. Hinamatsuri traces its origins to an ancient Japanese custom called hina-nagashi (雛流し, lit. “doll floating”), in which straw hina dolls are set afloat on a boat and sent down a river to the sea, supposedly taking troubles or bad spirits with them.(via wiki)

  • Meet Jesse jesse

    Captive Girls (previous post)

  • More delicous performances at the museum..