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Les Rendez-Vous de Paris – Eric Rohmer

August 6th, 2021
  • The everyday miracles of Eric Rohmer (Mubi Speical)

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    Les Rendez-Vous de Paris

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    Review by Janet Maslin

    Eric Rohmer’s “Rendezvous in Paris” is an oasis of contemplative intelligence in the summer movie season, presenting three graceful and elegant parables with the moral agility that distinguishes Rohmer as the Aesop of amour.
    Precise, simple and deeply serious beneath their breezy and seductive surface, these stories enchantingly explore love’s little treacheries and the stubborn immutability of human nature.

    Nadja (Expat Girl) in Paris with Eric Rohmer & Nestor Almendros

    August 21st, 2015
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    Nadja Tesich, the star of Eric Rohmer’s 1964 short film Nadja à Paris, originally wrote this essay in the 1990s, but never published it. In the last three months before she died in February 2014, I helped Nadja revise the piece, recording her thoughts and our discussions. —Lucy McKeon

    Nadjia in Paris

    I was madly in love with Paris and he had received a small sum from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs to make a film about foreign students in Paris. That’s it. Of course we liked talking with each other from the beginning, in spite of our differences—age, background, etc. He said we were very much alike, strange since he struck me as a bourgeois of sorts, while I considered myself doomed and displaced. In spite of his obvious intelligence, Eric didn’t have coherent political views. He never used words like exploitation or capitalism. I said yes to him because I was penniless and he offered me money—the same sum (either $200 or $400, I can’t remember) to all involved: cinematographer Néstor Almendros, the script girl and me. It meant I could pay for my dorm, eat for a few months, buy a pair of shoes. Greece will always be there, I decided.

  • (see part 2 from Nadia in Paris)

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    Nadjia and Eric Rohmer

  • I don’t know if Néstor was poorer than me or not. Probably the same. After Nadja à Paris his luck changed and he would go on to shoot many of Rohmer’s films, and eventually got an Oscar for Days of Heaven. Still, at that time, he was just a refugee Cuban who didn’t look Cuban but Spanish—tall, reserved, with a shyness that bordered on fear. He longed for a seersucker jacket, washable and weightless, I remember. I sent him one from my first salary. I knew nothing about him except that he had shot a documentary film in Cuba, his country that he hated. Néstor was gay, but this was not a problem for anyone except him. We accepted it, then forgot it, just like you accept that some prefer mountains to the sea.

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    (Eric Rohmer with Nestor Almendros)

    R.I.P Eric Rohmer (previous post with videos and links)

    Nestor Almendros (A Man with a Camera – see previous post)

  • Eric Rohmer’s elusive life revealed in a new biography

  • R.I.P Eric Rohmer

    January 12th, 2010
  • Obit Guardian

  • Eric Rohmer: philosopher, rhetorician, and an ally of the young

    Rohmer came from the New Wave tradition of critic-turned-director; he was a former editor of Cahiers du Cinéma, and became the distinctively romantic philosopher of the New Wave and the great master of what was sometimes called “intimist” cinema: delicate, un-showy movie-making about not especially startling people, people often in their 20s, whose lives are dramatised at a kind of walking, talking pace.

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  • Marquis d’O – directed by Eric Rohmer
    (Marquis d”O was based on the novel by Heinrich von Kleist)

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    Photos slideshow

    But the man born Jean-Marie Maurice Scherer, whose pseudonym took the first name of director Eric von Stroheim and the last of “Fu Manchu” creator Sax Rohmer, knew what he wanted. Natural light. A sense of humor, but a sidewinding one. (Via)

    “This sense of the unknowable emphasizes Rohmer’s understanding of the world as profoundly complicated. People are called upon to make choices whose consequences they cannot know. They have to deal not only with their own desires but also those of others. Desire is never simple. It is mixed with fear—often the fear of making the wrong choice.” (Previous post see M. Duras archive)

    Interview Eric Rohmer discusses with Barbet Schroeder the unique philosophical sensibility he brought to world cinema. (youtube)

    Horsesthink mentioned Nestor Almendros collaboration with Rohmer. (A Man with a Camera is a great book and Nestor’s collaboration with Rohmer were treated with respect and love. He mentioned how they both loved simplicity and austerity in design).


    (Full Moon in Paris)
    Dying young Pascale Ogier, Full Moon Ghost Story

  • AATaleofWinter