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Prankster Poet Painter Picabia’s Perpetual Movement – Francis Picabia at MoMa

November 22nd, 2016
  • Dada Picabia 1adadapicabia

    Picabia at MoMa..

  • Francis Picabia – 22 January 1879 – November 30, 1953

    Poet, painter, self-described funny guy, idiot, failure, pickpocket, and anti-artist par excellence, Francis Picabia was a defining figure in the Dada movement; indeed, André Breton called Picabia one of the only “true” Dadas.

  • Picabia

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    Daughter Born without Mother
    1916-18

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    L’oeil Cacodylate, 1921

    Google Picabia

    I Am A Beautiful Monster
    Who is with me is against me.

  • Duchamp, Beatrice Wood 1adadabeatricewconeyisland at Coney Island

    “Entr’acte,” the avant-garde film he made in 1924 with René Clair, and his contentious series of figurative paintings from the ’20s, ’30s and ’40s. Borrowing from art history, soft-core pornography and commercial art, they presage Pop Art, appropriation art and Neo-Expressionism.

  • Perpetual Movement 1adadapi

    “Our Heads Are Round So Our Thoughts Can Change Direction” is a Picabia aphorism consistent with another one: “The only movement is perpetual movement.” The show has a propulsive, joyous energy. Something new, different and often challenging waits in nearly every gallery.

    Dada is like your hopes: nothing like your paradise: nothing like your idols: nothing like your heroes: nothing like your artists: nothing like your religions: nothing

    Previous post

    Love Lasts Forever the Poet/Zen Master Leonard Cohen said, His last Album was “You Want it Darker”

    November 11th, 2016
  • 1abcohen

    photo via Cohencentric
    See the photo of Leonard Cohen’s last album here and explore this mega Leonard Cohen site.

  • Can’t imagine a world without Leonard Cohen, a deep avoid we must face in “Future” and hear his song again.

    Lonard Cohen dead at 82 (Rolling Stone)

    Yeats and Federico Garcia Lorca were Cohen’s favorite poets.

    Long time ago I was about 15 in my hometown of Montreal, I was rumbling through….or rambling as you say down here. We say “rumbling” .Actually we don’t say that at all. I was rumbling through this bookstore in Montreal. And I came upon this old book, a second-hand book of poems by a Spanish poet. I opened it up and I read these lines : “I want to pass through the arches of Elvira, to see your thighs and begin weeping”. Well that certainly was a refreshing sentiment. I began my own search for those arches those thighs and those tears….Another line “The morning through fistfuls of ants at my face” It’s a terrible idea. But this was a universe I understood thoroughly and I began to pursue it, I began to follow it and I began to live in it. And now these many years later, it is my great privilege to be able to offer my tiny homage to this great Spanish poet, the aniversary of whose assassination was celebrated two years ago. He was killed by the Civil Guards in Spain in 1936. But my real homage to this poet was naming my own daughter Lorca. It was Federico Garcia Lorca. I set one of his poems to music and translated it. He called it “Little Vienese Waltz”. My song is called “Take this Waltz”.

  • Cohen and Dylan 1abobcohen

  • With Sonny Rollings – Who by Fire

    More from Leonard Cohen Archive.

    Bob Dylan’s early interview by Studs Terkel in 1963

    October 17th, 2016
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    Photo by Danny Lyon.

  • Dylan 1dylan_terkel and Studs Terkel

    Studs Terkel interviews a very young Bob Dylan in 1963 and it’s incredible

    If you’re a fan of Dylan’s early work, I implore you to spend an hour with this stellar interview that he did with Studs Terkel from the spring of 1963 . You won’t regret it. It’s a very cool piece of history in my humble opinion.

    Bob Dylan is a notoriously tough person to interview and that’s definitely the case here, even this early in his life as a public persona. On the other hand, Terkel is a veteran interviewer, one of the best ever, and he seems genuinely impressed with the young man who was just 21 at the time and had but one record of mainly covers under his belt. Terkel does a good job of keeping things on track as he expertly gets out of the way and listens while gleaning what he can from his subject. It’s an interesting match-up.

  • Studs Terkelstudsterkel51 “guerilla journalist”

    Painting by Beverly Finster.

    If Not For You, Nobel, I Would Not Be Posting This + Ben Whishaw as Dylan

    October 14th, 2016
  • (Visiting Rubin Hurricane Carter)


  • Dylan and Levon Helm

    Bob Dylan and Levon playing Ping Pong here.

  • bob-dylan-3

    Via Ray Grasse –

    Bob Dylan wins the Nobel Prize for literature – the award will be formally handed out on Dec. 10th, just as Jupiter crosses over the top of his horoscope (which pretty much confirms that birth time.)

  • Cohen – Dylan Interface –

    It wasn’t [Bob Dylan’s] originality which first impressed me, but his familiarity. He was a person out of my books, singing to the real guitar. Dylan was what I’d always meant by the poet. – Leonard Cohen

  • If Nor For you – (photo by Willie Simpson)1bobwilliesimpson

  • Happy birthday Ben Whishaw 1benbob

  • See Bob Dylan – photo by Danny Lyon..

    The Hollow Men – Photo of T.S. Eliot & Ted Hughes + Willem Dafoe as Tom in Tom & Viv

    September 26th, 2016
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    Ted Hughes and Eliot

    TS Eliot, his wife Valerie and Ted Hughes at – in Hughes’s words – ‘one of the champagne and guinness parties’ that Faber used to throw

    Photograph: Faber Archive

  • This is the way the world ends
    This is the way the world ends
    This is the way the world ends
    Not with a bang but a whimper.

    The Hollow Men

    The Hollow Men
    Mistah Kurtz-he dead
    A penny for the Old Guy

  • M8DTOAN EC002

    Tom and Viv

  • The Fraught Friendship of T. S. Eliot and Groucho Marx (New Yorker)

  • Bernie Sanders & Burlington Snow – a Poem by Allen Ginsberg

    September 7th, 2016
  • 1allenbernie-sanders

    See Allen Ginsberg’s Handwritten Poem For Bernie Sanders, “Burlington Snow” (1986)

    Ginsberg blog

    Bernie and Allen 1allenberniecartoon

  • With his big brother 1berniechild

    Happy birthday Bernie Sanders!

    Photos via

  • 1aAndrewBonheler
    via Andrew Bonheler
    See previous post on Bernie Sanders (Contempt for Voters, theater of cruelty, undemocratic primary of 2016.

  • Martin Buber. I and thou.

    “The real struggle is not between East and West, or capitalism and communism, but between education and propaganda.”
    ― Martin Buber

    “An animal’s eyes have the power to speak a great language.”
    ― Martin Buber
    Sparrow Impromptu in Portland – Hilarious Falcon Flying from Bosnia to Syria – War and Peace Spring of 2016

    Comic Cat, Lit Cat, Film Noir Cat – Happy Int’l Cat day!

    August 8th, 2016
  • The Cop and Peter Cook the Comic Genius

  • Doris Lessing
    Doris Lessing archive here.

    Herman 1HermanHesse
    and the Cat.
    . another photo from writing & the feline muse.

    Herman Hesse - The Glass Bead Game

  • Yuichi Hibi – Neco hibineko

    Kay Ryan
    A CAT/A FUTURE

    A cat can draw
    the blinds
    behind her eyes
    whenever she
    decides. Nothing
    alters in the stare
    itself but she’s
    not there. Likewise
    a future can occlude:
    still sitting there,
    doing nothing rude.

  • Patricia Highsmith (archive) 1patriciaJeannette

    Frank O’Hara & Bill Berkson – Hymns of St. Bridget

    August 3rd, 2016
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    With Frank Ohara

    In a biographical note he wrote for An Anthology of New York Poets (edited by Ron Padgett and David Shapiro in 1970), Berkson paid tribute to O’Hara’s deep influence on him:

    General ‘cultural’ education through friendship with Frank O’Hara: the Stravinsky-Balanchine Agon (and Edwin Denby’s essay on it), Satie (we created four-hand ‘annoyances’ at various apartments, once played for Henze in Rome), Feldman, Turandot, a certain Prokofiev toccato, Virgil Thomson (I had heard a recording of Four Saints at Harry Smith’s, Providence, 1957), movies … we read Wyatt together, recited Racine, skipped through galleries, collaborated on The Hymns of St. Bridget 1961-64, a note on Reverdy for Mercure de France 1961.

    As he later told Brad Gooch, “I listened hard to what he said about poetry, about all the arts, about people, about living.”

  • Read For the Chinese New Year & for Bill Berkson by Frank O’Hara here.

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    Hymns St Bridget (jacket)

    Hymns Of St. Bridget begins simply enough in October 1960 as the first collaboration between Bill Berkson and Frank O’Hara — from there it multiplies energetically into an ongoing exchange between Berkson and O’Hara that includes the FYI poems, The Letters of Angelicus and Fidelio, and Marcia: An Unfinished Novel.

    Bill Berkson (1939–2016)

    Wiki

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    With Ron Padgett

    via

  • Muhammad Ali and Marianne Moore Wrote a Poem together

    June 4th, 2016
  • Moore 1AliMarianneMoore and Ali
    via

    He announced that if she was the greatest poetess in the country, the two of them should produce something together — “I am a poet, too,” he said — a joint effort sonnet, it was to be, with each of them doing alternate lines. Miss Moore nodded vaguely. Ali was very much the more decisive of the pair, picking not only the form but also the topic: “Mrs. Moore and I are going to write a sonnet about my upcoming fight in Houston with Ernie Terrell,” he proclaimed to the table. “Mrs. Moore and I will show the world with this great poem who is who and what is what and who is going to win.”

    “We will call it ‘A Poem on the Annihilation of Ernie Terrell,’ ” Miss Moore announced. “Let us be serious but not grim.”

    “She’s cute,” Ali commented. (read here via )

    After we defeat Ernie Terrell
    He will get nothing, nothing but hell,
    Terrell was big and ugly and tall
    But when he fights me he is sure to fall.
    If he criticize this poem by me and Miss Moore
    To prove he is not the champ she will stop him in four,
    He is claiming to be the real heavyweight champ
    But when the fight starts he will look like a tramp
    He has been talking too much about me and making me sore
    After I am through with him he will not be able to challenge Mrs. Moore.

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    Photo by Danny Lyon – 1970.

    Emerson,Raymond Carver & Theodore Rothke – American Originals

    May 25th, 2016
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    Ralph Waldo Emerson -b. May 25, 1803

    1) When asked to sum up his work, he said his central doctrine was “the infinitude of the private man.” Emerson is also well known as a mentor and friend of fellow Transcendentalist Henry David Thoreau (via wiki )
    Walt Whitman sent a copy of Leaves of Grass to Emerson.
    Emerson was strongly influenced by the Vedas, and much of his writing has strong shades of nondualism. One of the clearest examples of this can be found in his essay “The Over-soul”:

    Quotes by Emerson

    Children are all foreigners.

    Democracy becomes a government of bullies tempered by editors.

    Do not go where the path may lead, go instead where there is no path and leave a trail.

    Don’t be too timid and squeamish about your actions. All life is an experiment. The more experiments you make the better.

    Emerson tweets
    – What I must do is all that concerns me, not what the people think
    – I can find my biography in every fable.

  • 1aCarverRay
    Raymond Carver -b. May 25, 1938

  • Prose as Architecture: two interviews with Raymond Carver

    Suppose I say summer,
    write the word “hummingbird,”
    put it in an envelope,
    take it down the hill
    to the box. When you open
    my letter you will recall
    those days and how much,
    just how much, I love you.
    Raymond Carver

    Dreams Are What We Wake Up From, directed by Daisy Goodwin. (Youtube)

  • Theodore Rothke 1acunninghamRothke

    b. May 25, 1908
    photo by Imogen Cunningham, 1959

    MY PAPA’S WALTZ

    The whiskey on your breath
    Could make a small boy dizzy;
    But I hung on like death:
    Such waltzing was not easy.

    We romped until the pans
    Slid from the kitchen shelf;
    My mother’s countenance
    Could not unfrown itself.

    The hand that held my wrist
    Was battered on one knuckle;
    At every step you missed
    My right ear scraped a buckle.

    You beat time on my head
    With a palm caked hard by dirt,
    Then waltzed me off to bed
    Still clinging to your shirt.

  • 5 Poems by Rothke on youtube here.

  • Robert Creeley – Two Poems & Two Photos – May 21, 2016

    May 21st, 2016
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    Robert Creeley (Photo by Jonathan Williams)

  • I know a man

    by Robert Creeley

    As I sd to my
    friend, because I am
    always talking,—John, I

    sd, which was not his
    name, the darkness sur-
    rounds us, what

    can we do against
    it, or else, shall we &
    why not, buy a goddamn big car,

    drive, he sd, for
    christ’s sake, look
    out where yr going.

    Poem via

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    Ginsberg, Anne Wildman and Robert Creeley.

  • Anne Wildman she has multiplied – number song.

  • America
    by Robert Creeley

    America, you ode for reality!
    Give back the people you took.

    Let the sun shine again
    on the four corners of the world

    you thought of first but do not
    own, or keep like a convenience.

    People are your own word, you
    invented that locus and term.

    Here, you said and say, is
    where we are. Give back

    what we are, these people you made,
    us, and nowhere but you to be.

    “America” Creeley’s poem serves to highlight the inconsistent attitude of America. Too often the nation is caught up in world affairs rather than addressing the issues at home.” via

    Daniel Berrigan, Poet, Jesuit Priest, Peace Activist Dies at 94

    May 1st, 2016
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    (DANIEL REV.BERRIGAN read two poems at . meeting In the Immaculate Conception Churchmen, then warned that the United States Is “being governed by wounded leaden.)

    Daniel Berrigan, Poet,Jesuit Priest, Peace Activist Dies at 94.
    NYtimes obit

    Daniel Berrigan (wiki)

    Protest against the Vietnam war..Berrigan, his brother Josephite priest Philip Berrigan, and Trappist monk Thomas Merton founded an interfaith coalition against the Vietnam War, and wrote letters to major newspapers arguing for an end to the war. In 1967, Daniel and Phillip were arrested for pouring blood on draft records as part of the Baltimore Four. Phillip was sentenced to six years in prison for defacing government property. This, and his belief that his support of prisoners of war during the war was not acknowledged and appreciated, further radicalized Berrigan against the United States government.

    Berrigan traveled to Hanoi with Howard Zinn during the Tet Offensive in January 1968 to “receive” three American airmen, the first American POWs released by the North Vietnamese since the U.S. bombing of that nation had begun.

  • The Church should be making art not just cover bands.

  • Berrigan with Merton 1aBerriganMerton

    photo via

    Father Berrigan said that coaching the film’s stars, Robert De Niro and Jeremy Irons, on their roles as priests had been like working on two different planets. Irons plays the head of the mission and De Niro portrays an ex- mercenary and slave trader who becomes a priest.

    “Irons is more of a method actor,” said Father Berrigan. “He wanted to get inside the thinking of a Jesuit. I told him the only thing to do was to fast. He and I spent a day without food or water, and Irons frequently went off my himself to meditate.

    “De Niro is a natural genius. All he wanted to do was question me for hours about being a priest.”

    via Philly.com.

    He also had a way of popping up in the wider culture: as the “radical priest” in Paul Simon’s song “Me and Julio Down by the Schoolyard”; as inspiration for the character Father Corrigan in Colum McCann’s 2009 novel, “Let the Great World Spin.” He even had a small movie role, appearing as a Jesuit priest in “The Mission” in 1989.

    Looking Back In Gratitude

    On my return to America House after the interview, I looked up the poem in the June 13, 1942, issue; it is called “Storm-Song,” an ode to the Virgin Mary. A decade or so later, an editor at Macmillan who had heard about Berrigan’s poetry asked him for a collection of his poems. He told Berrigan that he would give it to the “toughest reader” at Macmillan; and if the report was good, “we’ll publish it.” That reader turned out to be Marianne Moore, a highly regarded poet, who gave the manuscript a glowing report. It led to the publication in 1953 of Berrigan’s first book of poetry, Time Without Number, which won the Lamont Poetry Prize in 1957.