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Joaquin Phoenix Rising, Films directed by Lynne Ramsay, G. Van Sant & Jacques Audiard

December 9th, 2018

  • (Last year J. Phoenix won the best actor and Lynne Ramsay won the best scriptwriter award at Cannes)

    Guillame Del Toro tweeted.

    Lynn Ramsey’s You Were Never Really Here. What a great film… Non-fetishized violence, gritty poetry and full of humanity. One of the best directors working -and a fearless actor by her side.

    Phoenix was protective with Ramsay, neither of them were fond of talking – see Cannes Press Conference (Youtube)

    LA Times

    Joaquin Phoenix and Lynne Ramsay follow their instincts to find ‘You Were Never Really Here’

    “We filmed this shot of me floating in this pool, and she just got in the pool with me, and just was there with me, right off-camera,” Phoenix explained. “There’s something about Lynne—she feels things very strongly. You’ll hear her breathing and making sounds off-camera because you know that she’s in it. But she got in the pool with me, and that was on the first day of filming! I was like, ‘Ah, I love this woman’ Vanity Fair . .


  • Don’t Worry, He Won’t Get Far On Foot

    Rooney Mara played the ex-wife in “Her”. Joaquin P. suggested to Gus Van Sant that she plays the girlfriend of the Portland Cartoonist.

    (Portrait of Lautrec on the wall, Gus Van Sant directing Joaquin Phoenix)

    After River’s death, Van Sant offered him a meaty role in the black comedy “To Die For,” co-starring Nicole Kidman and Matt Dillon. It was Joaquin’s first role in four years.
    Twenty-three years later, Van Sant and Joaquin Phoenix are together again in “Don’t Worry, He Won’t Get Far on Foot,” a film about the late quadriplegic cartoonist John Callahan, who lived in Van Sant’s hometown of Portland, Ore.

  • Sisters Brothers – Jacques Audiard, Joaquin Phoenix, John C Reilley

    Joaquin Phoenix: ‘Jacques Audiard is unique, even among French directors’

  • Jacques Audiard at MoMa

  • Phoenix rising from Australia (more insightful)

    Is Joaquin Phoenix set to be the greatest actor of his generation?

  • The Last Emperor of 1900 Bernardo Bertolucci was a Non- Conformist,

    November 27th, 2018
  • RIP Bernardo Bertolucci

  • 1aBernardoMarlon

    [on Marlon Brando] An angel as a man, a monster as an actor. – Bernardo Bertolucci

  • Luca Guadagnino and Bernardo B. Two non-conformist Italian directors

  • Why Bertolucci’s The Conformist deserves a place in cinema history(the Guardian)

    The Italian director’s 1970 expressionist masterpiece offered a blueprint for a new kind of Hollywood film, which is why Coppola, Spielberg, Scorsese and co owe him a huge debt


  • (1900)

    (Julian on Bernardo – talking about 1900)

  • 1aBernardoTangier
    via Bruce Weber
    (Malkovich moved to Europe after working with Bertolucci in Sheltering Aky).

  • Frequently references classic movies
    Frequently has nude scenes in his films
    Long, complex camera movements.
    Often references famous painters or art movements.
    Nonlinear timeline.

    The young Bertolucci took after his father, a Roman poet and film critic, and became a celebrated published poet by the age of 20. He gave up poetry for the cinema after working as an assistant to Pier Paolo Pasolini on the movie Accattone (1961).

    He’s a big fan of Breaking Bad (2008).
    [on the end of Breaking Bad (2008)] I’m sad about it. I want more.

    via

    Bad Timing, The Significance of Nicolas Roeg’s Passing

    November 24th, 2018

  • Nicolas Roeg passed away – (Tributes from Donald Sutherland, Duncan Jones etc)

    BBC obit

    Nicolas Roeg was one of the most original film-makers the UK has ever produced.
    His early experience as a cinematographer brought a stunning visual quality to his work.

  • (Best obit – read here)

  • The Alchemy of Nicolas Roeg (Dan Fox) (Frieze II)

    His work sits closer to that of Derek Jarman, Peter Greenaway, Andrea Arnold, Sally Potter, Steve McQueen and other British art house directors, than the storytelling of Lean, Lester, Schlesinger, and other directors he cut his teeth with.

    Nicolas Roeg in conversation (Frieze I)

    Film director Nicolas Roeg talks to his friend, the artist John Stezaker, about collage, editing and memory, and film’s ability to ‘trap shadows’

  • BAD TIMING, Art Garfunkel, Theresa Russell, director Nicolas Roeg on set, 1980, (c) World Northal

    Obit from his close friend and a producer Jeremy Thomas

    (see Theresa Russell playing Marilyn here )- Look Now, the significance of Nicolas Roeg (previous post)


  • Thanks to “Walkabout”, David Gulpilil became an actor/activist, and the kid who is not in this photo was Nicolas Roeg’s son).

  • 1NickBowie
    (Filming The Man Who Fell to Earth)
    The documentary of the Man Who Fell to Earth – 2017 here.


  • (Julie Christie in Don’t Look Now, and Roeg was a cinematographer for Far From the Madding Crowd, Farenheidt 451 and Petulia (Richard Lester)

  • Don’t Look Now – a review + interviews here.

  • In all of his films Nicolas Roeg shows what happens when characters from different cultures intersect. From Performance (gangster meets rock star) to Walkabout (abandoned white children saved by Aborigine on his walkabout) to The Man Who Fell to Earth (alien crashing on Earth needs to return to his home planet) this intersection forms the core dramatic element of his films.

    RIP Pablo Ferro -A Title Designer for Kubrick, Van Sant, Hal Ashby etc.

    November 19th, 2018

  • (via Art of the Title – see title sequences by Pablo Ferro here)

  • Title Designer for Dr. Strangelove, Pablo Ferro dies.

    “The titles for ‘Strangelove’ were last-minute; I didn’t have much time to produce it. It came up because of a conversation between Stanley and I,” he said. “Two weeks after I finished with everything, he and I were talking. He asked me what I thought about human beings. I said one thing about human beings is that everything that is mechanical, that is invented, is very sexual. We looked at each other and realized — the B-52, refueling in mid-air, of course, how much more sexual can you get?! He loved the idea. He wanted to shoot it with models we had, but I said let me take a look at the stock footage, I am sure that [the makers of those planes] are very proud of what they did and, sure enough, they had shot the plane from every possible angle.”

    He was also known for creating the first color NBC Peacock in the late 1950s while at Elektra. He worked on nine films directed by Jonathan Demme, including “Stop Making Sense,” “Philadelphia,” and “Married to the Mob.”

    He continued to design through the ’90s, making title sequences for Gus van Sant’s “Good Will Hunting,” “L.A. Confidential,” and the first “Men In Black.” He was close friends with
    Hal Ashby

    Frederick Elmes – Cinematographer for Lynch, Jarmusch, Ang Lee etc.

    November 4th, 2018

  • (Eraserhead)

    Frederick Elmes was born on November 4, 1946 in Mountain Lakes, New Jersey, USA.

    photo via

    Elms often works with David Lynch, Jim Jarmusch and Ang Lee. Eraserhead, Wild at Heart Night on Earth, Blue Velvet, The Ice Storm Ride with the Devil , The Object of My Affection, Synecdoche, Coffee and Cigarettes, Kinsey, Paterson etc.
    *
    1ablanchett
    Coffee and Cigarettes – Cate Blanchet in two roles.

    Frederick Elmes (homepage)

  • Dean Stockwell dean-stockwell in Blue Velvet

  • 1asamdriverPaterson
    Nagase and Adam Driver (“Nagase from Mystery Train reuninted with Jarmusch in Paterson)

    Elmes says he held back on bold colouring, preferring to keep the look naturalistic. “Slightly desaturating the image and lowering the contrast presented a subtle visual support to the repetition of Paterson’s life. A life that’s worth living,” he concludes.


  • (Tilda Swinton in Broken Flowers)
    Happy birthday Tilda Swinton!

  • Viggo Mortensen – Polaroids 2018

    October 19th, 2018
  • 10 Polaroids by Viggo Mortensen

  • We are here to discuss “Green Book,” his newest film, out this November, two years after his critically acclaimed performance in “Captain Fantastic,” the story of a family raised outside of our late-stage capitalist society, which garnered him his second Academy Award nomination for best actor (the first was for “Eastern Promises”).

  • Viggo Mortensen reads Bartolomé de Las Casas

  • 1aAlonsoJauja

    <> <>1AlonsoJ

  • Today Viggo Mortesen lives in Madrid with his girlfriend.
    Ariel Dorfman (Playwright of Death and Maiden) on Viggo:
    During a production of his play Purgatorio, Dorfman was challenged by the actor Viggo Mortensen, who was insistent about a line of dialogue: “This doesn’t make sense!” he kept repeating. “He wouldn’t let me go,” Dorfman says. And Mortensen was right. The actor was able to teach Dorfman something about his own play. “You learn, if there’s no aggression in an artist exchange.” If an actor or editor is generous and open, the writer can gain something.

  • Subrata Mitra – Celebrated Cinematographer + Satyajit Ray’s Sketches

    October 12th, 2018
  • Subrata Mitra

    Remembering the great cinematographer Subrata Mitra, best known for his collaboration with Satyajit Ray, on his 88th birth anniversary. He was the man who revolutionized the art of cinematography by introducing the technique of bounce lighting for the very first time. Many celebrated cinematographers, including Vittorio Storaro, Nestor Almendros and Takao Saito, got influenced by his extraordinary works.

    Thanks to Debayan Roy for posting

    MUBI Subrata Mitra

  • 1aCharulata
    Charulata (youtube)

  • Rare ketches Satyajit Ray
    (The Pather Panchali Sketchbook’ has been edited by the master filmmaker’s son, Sandip Ray.)

  • Adieu Charles Aznavour – Our Armenian Ambassader

    October 2nd, 2018
  • Aznavour
    via aznavour

    Charles Aznavour wiki

    In a career spanning over 70 years, he recorded more than 1,200 songs interpreted in eight languages.[6] He wrote or co-wrote more than 1,000 songs for himself and others.

  • 1aznavour2
    Shoot the Piano Player
    (Truffaut archive here)

  • A tribute from Fuse Akira who translated Aznavour’s song here ..(youtube)

  • Ararat by Atom Egoyan
    Who is telling the truth? about the Armenians.

  • RIP Annette Michelson, Pioneer Film Critic, Co-Founder of “October”

    September 18th, 2018

  • Annette Michelson (photo via)

  • Art News – Annette Michelsonk Pioneering Film Critic, Co-founder October dies at 96.


  • Photo by Fung Lin Hall

  • Fabulous Japanese Actress, Kiki Kirin – Moved On at 75

    September 16th, 2018
  • Kiki Kirin

    Josh Parmer posted on FB a sad and shocking news that Kiki Kirin (樹木 希林) passed away. (See a great photo of Kiki there)

    May your body rest and your soul soar Kiki Kirin. You have been one of my favorite actresses since I first saw you back in Still Walking.

    Japan times Obit

  • Interview with Kiki
    Kiki Kirin’s response here.

    Regarding the afterlife, there is the Buddhist idea of rebirth. Right now, my soul is in this body and this body is Kirin Kiki. After this body is used up and death comes around, that soul and spirit moves on and reappears. I don’t see death as an end.

  • 1an-2kawase

    Kiki with Nagase (Previous post)

  • Koreeda and Kiki (Shoplifters won Palme’dor at Cannes – 2018)

  • Still Walking aruitemo

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    Previous Cannes festival.

    Kiki, for whom After the Storm is her fifth Koreeda film, described the director as among one of the most observant she has seen in her 55-year career.

    Paul Schrader, Travis to Ernst, & Letter to Leonard Schrader

    September 3rd, 2018

  • (“First Reformed” directed by Paul Schrader)

    On casting Ethan Hawk (Spoiler alert!)

    “There’s a certain physiognomy in playing a man of the cloth, be it Montgomery Clift in ‘I Confess,’ Belmondo in ‘Leon Morin’ or Claude Laydu in ‘Diary of a Country Priest.’ So, you’re thinking about actors who have that physiognomy, maybe Jake Gyllenhaal, Oscar Isaac, but Ethan was 10 years older than them and his face was getting some very interesting wrinkles. I started thinking he’s just right for this. I sent him the script and he responded right away.”

  • Shooting fast, took only 22 days of filming.
    Budget $3.5 million. (Investers got their money back)

    Richard Brody on first reformed – (The reckless passions of Paul Schrader)

  • On naming the Pastor “Ernst Toller” –

    Yup. I did. I came across the name years ago in a poem by W.H. Auden, but there were two things about the name I liked. One was the “tolling” of the bells. The other was the playwright who escaped Nazi Germany to come to America and then committed suicide

  • Willem Dafoe 1aaPaulDafoe
    (The Light Sleeper)

    Dafoe and Schrader have collaborated many times, The Light Sleeper, The Affliction and Auto-Focus etc.

  • Light Sleeper, American Gigolo etc. (Mishima, Patty Hearst and Auto Focus were incredible biopics, and Schrader directed late Natasha Richardson twice – she played Patty Hearst and was also in the Comfort of Strangers, scripted by Harold Pinter based on a short novel by Ian McEwan.)

  • Polygon Interview – (First Reformed, Taxi Driver filmmaker Paul Schrader will change how you think about movies)

    Which modern, American filmmakers have mastered leaning in?
    Paul Schrader: In America, [Wendy and Lucy and Meek’s Cutoff director] Kelly Reichardt works that way. Gus van Sant did that three film trilogy [Gerry, Elephant, and Last Days].

  • 1AAmishima06
    Paul Schrader directing Mishima, A Life in 4 Chapters, his sister in law acted as his interpreter with Japanese crew and actors.
    (Philip Glass composed the soundtrack, Eiko Ishioka designed the set, Mishima was Schrader’s most theatrically stylised film.)
    His brother Leonard knew Mishima.

    On Mishima.. ( His Final Performance, the Suicide of Yukio Mishima )

  • Read his letter to his brother Leonard Schrader (His visit to Jean Renoir in Beverly Hills )

    I spent the afternoon at Jean Renoir’s home in Beverly Hills, and was very entertained. Jean (as we friends call him) is shooting four short stories for French TV. During some continental business haggles he decided to come back to L.A. for two weeks. He told Max Laemmle, manager of the Los Feliz Theater, that my article on Boudu was the best he had ever read. He then sent me a letter to thank me, enclosing an autographed photo, asking for a tear sheet for Michel Simon, and inviting me to his home.
    So Joel and I (Joel is an old friend of the Renoirs) were there this afternoon. This is an exceedingly kind, gracious, and fragile person. Just like his films: you can’t help but love him. We had a very interesting conversation about Bresson, Simon, Moreau, Magnani, Chabrol, Truffaut, but I remember the afternoon primarily as an experience, like a warm bath. His home is covered with original paintings by his father, Picasso, Cezanne, Braque, etc. In his living room hangs a larger-than-life-size portrait of Jean at 17 painted by his father: he is young and handsome, has a shotgun and hunting dog. Jean, now past 70, bald and pink-faced, was sitting in a chair in front of that painting. I think I’ll always remember that view. He is, as he describes Picasso, “a force of nature.” I think he is a greater artist than his father, for he invented the vocabulary before he embellished it. You think my head’s swelling. Peut-être.


  • (Robert Mitchum and Keiko Kishi in Yakuza)
    Sydney Pollack directed Yakuza, scripted by Leonard Schrader, Paul Schrader and Robert Towne.

    Barbet Schroeder Gives His All to Each Film as a Producer, Director & a Thinker

    August 26th, 2018

  • (Amnesia – directed by Barbet Schroeder – His mother’s house in Ibiza was used twice in his films, Amnesia and More, his first film)

    See a trailer here.

    Berbet Schroeder in Conversation on Walter Benjamin, R. Housemann, Pink Floyd.

    Hausmann actually had a whole colony of other German intellectuals, poets, painters. And this house [in Amnesia] was influenced by Hausmann, it was not built by him. But it was influenced by him and his group. It was built in 1936 and my mother bought it in 1951.
    AKT: Was Walter Benjamin part of that group around Raoul Hausmann?
    BS: Yes, he was! Walter Benjamin was actually not far from this house. He was in the fishermen village that was 15 minutes by foot from this house.

  • 1aabsbulle-ogiermaitresse
    Barbet Schroeder directing his wife Bulle Ogier in Maitresse.

    “It is the element of adventure in all creative activity that particularly interests Schroeder. He is a producer, a catalyst, but also a director and an actor. He is a Renaissance man. He began as a critic for Cahiers du Cinema. He gives his all to each film. When he produced La Collectuionneuse, he wento into debt to do so. He was the first to believe in Rohmer.” wrote Nestor Almendros (A Man with a Camera).

    From Barbet Schroeder’s first film “More” Nestor Almendros was his D.P and also credited as set designer in some films, their collaboration continued to “The Valley, “Obscured by Clouds”, “General Idi Amin Dada”, “Maitresse”, “Koko, the Talking Gorilla”

  • 1aaBarbettBarfly3
    (Barbet Schroeder with Mickey Rourke and Bukowski – on set filming Barfly)

  • Terror’s Advocate

    NONFICTION FILM – MOVIES – Experiments in terror – Director Barbet Schroeder has a particular flair for films that expose the evil that walks among us.

  • Many interesting photos here for Barbet Schroeder .

  • French producer Barbet Schroeder (L) and

    French producer Barbet Schroeder (L) and German Rainer Werner Fassbinder are photographed in Cannes on May 12, 1979 during the 32nd International Film Festival where they present Fassbinder’s film “The third generation”. AFP PHOTO RALPH GATTI (Photo credit should read RALPH GATTI/AFP/Getty Images)