+

Film Adaptations of Parades’ End by Ford Madoxx Ford & Disgrace by J.M. Coetzee

December 16th, 2016
  • 1afbebedict
    Benedict Cumberbatch was terrific in Parades’ End. (On Parades’ End Cumberbatch on youtube here)

    Parades’ End is a Novel by Ford Madoxx Ford, script by Tom Stoppard.

  • 1ajoyce-pound-ford-quinn
    James Joyce, Ezra Pound, Ford Maddox Ford and John Quinn

    Dec 17 birthday of Ford Madox Ford.

    via Wiki.. Hemingway devoted a chapter of his Parisian memoir A Moveable Feast to an encounter with Ford at a café in Paris during the early 1920s. He describes Ford “as upright as an ambulatory, well clothed, up-ended hogshead.”
    Ford had an affair with Jean Rhys . it ended badly..

    Ford Madoxx Ford

  • J. M. Coetzee1acoetzeebooks
    Coetzee completed a Master’s thesis on Ford Madox Ford

    John Malkovich 1acoetzeedisgrace
    Disgrace

    Review of Disgrace by Roger Ebert

    I awaited the closing scenes of “Disgrace” with a special urgency, because the story had gripped me deeply but left me with no idea how it would end. None — and I really cared. This is such a rare movie.

    Fotos of Jane Birkin with Agnes Varda, Rivette & Tavernier + J.Birkin Painting by Julian Schnabel

    December 14th, 2016
  • 1aabirkinwindow1aabiagnes
    Jane Birkin with Agnes Varda

    Happy birthay Jane Birkin!

  • Daddy Nostalgia.1aabirkin

    Dirk Bogarde, Tavernier and Jane Birkin

  • Julian Schnabel Jane Birkin

  • 1ajacquesBirkin

    With Rivette

    Museum Hours, Two Impromptu Performances – 2016

    December 7th, 2016
  • artk
    Title: Singer of Tales
    Scultpure installation by Jon Isherwood

  • Woody would meet Dick Cavett at the Met - read Museum Hours by David Ehrenstein.

  • artcragg
    (Tony Cragg Sculpture installation)
    Photos by Fung Lin Hall

  • Museum Hours by Jem Cohen – Art, Life & Mystery (previous post)

    “Un Homme de Fragment”, The Last Laugh of the Melancholy Philosopher Emil Cioran

    December 1st, 2016
  • <> 1acioranflickr
    The Philosopher of Failure: Emil Cioran’s Heights of Despair
    -By Costica Bradatan

    On Two types of societies –

    All societies are bad; but there are degrees, I admit, and if I have chosen this one, it is because I can distinguish among the nuances of trumpery” .

    Emil Cioran (1911–1995) was a Romanian-born French philosopher and author of some two dozen books of savage, unsettling beauty. He is an essayist in the best French tradition, and even though French was not his native tongue, many think him among the finest writers in that language. His writing style is whimsical, unsystematic, fragmentary; he is celebrated as one of the great masters of aphorism. But the “fragment” was for Cioran more than a writing style: it was a vocation and a way of life; he called himself “un homme de fragment.”

  • Cioran

    Emil Cioran (wiki) The Melancholy thinker..

    Regarding God, Cioran has noted that “without Bach, God would be a complete second rate figure” and that “Bach’s music is the only argument proving the creation of the Universe cannot be regarded a complete failure”.

    William H. Gass called Cioran’s work “a philosophical romance on the modern themes of alienation, absurdity, boredom, futility, decay, the tyranny of history, the vulgarities of change, awareness as agony, reason as disease”. (via wki)

    (repost, see other philosophers)

  • 1acioran10

    10 Delightfully Surly Books for the Relentless Pessimist

    (via)

  • 1acioranem

    A further glimpse into Cioran’s peculiar manner of political thinking, in a letter he sent to Mircea Eliade in 1935: “My formula for all things political,” he writes, “is the following: fight wholeheartedly for things in which you do not believe.” Not that such a confession brings much clarity to Cioran’s involvement, but it places his “ravings” within a certain psychological perspective. This split personality characterized the later Cioran, and it makes sense, for a philosopher who sees the world as a failure of grand proportions, to mock the cosmic order (and himself in the process) by pretending that there is some meaning where there is none. You know that everything is pointless, but by behaving as if it wasn’t, you manage to articulate your dissent and undermine the designs of the “evil demiurge.” And you do that with boundless irony and humor, which is rigorously meant to counter the divine farce. He who laughs last laughs hardest.