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DaVinci Chianti & The Last Supper – Hiroshi Sugimoto, Foster Won Isamu Noguchi Prize

May 16th, 2014
  • Norman Foster, Hiroshi Sugimoto receive Isamu Noguchi Award

    Norman Foster (Arch daily)

    Acts of God – Hiroshi Sugimoto (see more here)

    Related links
    Click to see large (
    (Some Living American Women Artists)

    Click to see large DaVinci Chianti 2012
    Photo by Fung Lin Hall

  • Mao's Last Banquet
    Mao’s Last Banquet by Zhang Hongtu

    Stanley Theater by Sugimoto – (scroll down)

  • Shigeru Ban – Architect of Emergency Shlter wins Pritzker

    March 25th, 2014
  • Click to see large
    Humanitarian activities (design boom)

    Shigeru Ban (NY times) wins Pritzker

    The Guardian on Shigeru Ban

  • David Shapiro

    My student Shigeru Ban wins the Pritzker for his work in temporary structures. Look up his curtain house blowing in wind. And for his tubes of cardboard. I loved a poem he wrote that was about being confused at 20 by going from Japan to New York all the time. His embrace of victims of the storms. Proud of his clear architecture.Another example of the greatness of John Hejduk’s conception of the social contract which is, after all, architecture. The fantasies at Cooper became the poetry within disaster. Cardboard !

    Shigeru Ban.Paper tube emergency shelter .Time lapse video

  • City for Lovers and Friends – Lewis Mumford – Banksy in Studio

    October 19th, 2013

    Forget the damned motor car and build the cities for lovers and friends.

    Lewis Mumford (October 19, 1895 – January 26, 1990) was an American historian, sociologist, philosopher of technology, and literary critic. Particularly noted for his study of cities and urban architecture, he had a broad career as a writer.

  • Edward Burtynsky - Navajo reservation adjacent to a Phoenix suburb.


  • via Robin Gunningham/Mr Banksy… or Banksy in Studio

  • Why Scandinavian Prisons are Superior.

    It’s a postcard-perfect day on Suomenlinna Island, in Helsinki’s South Harbor. Warm for the first week of June, day trippers mix with Russian, Dutch, and Chinese tourists sporting sun shades and carrying cones of pink ice cream.

    “Is this the prison?” asks a 40-something American woman wearing cargo pants and a floral sleeveless blouse.

    R.I.P Paolo Soleri – Architect, Theorist of Archology

    April 10th, 2013

    Remembering Paulo Soleri 1919-2013

    Today the world has lost one of its great minds. Paolo Soleri, architect, builder, artist, writer, theorist, husband, father, born on Summer Solstice, June 21, 1919, has died at age 93.

    Soleri spent a lifetime investigating how architecture, specifically the architecture of the city, could support the countless possibilities of human aspiration. The urban project he founded, Arcosanti , 65 miles north of Phoenix, was described by NEWSWEEK magazine as “…the most important urban experiment undertaken in our lifetimes.”

    Click to see large
    Paolo Soleri used to host Italian night, where he cooked for a few hundred people at Arcosanti. We will miss him and his dinners greatly. We all bought his bells and enjoyed taking visitors to Cosanti or Arcosanti.

  • See young Paulo Soleri at Frank Lloyd Wright Taliesen West. (Design Boom mentions his early beginning with Frank Lloyd Wright)

  • Here are photos from visit to Cosanti in Scottsdale.

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    (Click to see large)

    Archology - Arcosanti

    “My position is not reductionist; my position is minimalist. Nothing is or becomes outside the big bang. Each organism is the big bang in action.” Paolo Soleri

    “In nature, as an organism evolves it increases in complexity and it also becomes a more compact or miniaturized system. Similarly a city should function as a living system. Arcology, architecture and ecology as one integral process, is capable of demonstrating positive response to the many problems of urban civilization, population, pollution, energy and natural resource depletion, food scarcity and quality of life. Arcology recognizes the necessity of the radical reorganization of the sprawling urban landscape into dense, integrated, three-dimensional cities in order to support the complex activities that sustain human culture. The city is the necessary instrument for the evolution of humankind.” —Paolo Soleri

    Oscar Niemeyer R.I.P

    December 6th, 2012

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    Oscar Niemeyer dies at 104

    Architects, critics pay tributes to Oscar Niemeyer

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    Oscar Niemeyer – A Memory of Bienneial Sao Paulo

    The Man from Rio - Niemeyer

    The Billy Rose Garden in Jerusalem – Isamu Noguchi

    November 16th, 2012
  • Dome

    Noguchi Garden
    in Jerusalem <>

    ( Photos by Fung-Lin Hall taken from the Billy Rose Garden in Jerusalem)

  • Isamu Noguchi – Nov 17, 1904

  • (image via)

    This set by acclaimed designer Isamu Noguchi, used in Martha Graham’s ‘Embattled Garden,’ was damaged when basement storage of the Martha Graham Dance Company, located in the West Village, flooded in late October 2012. The company said it is still assessing the extent of the damage.

    See Isamu Noguchi design from The Appalachian Spring..

  • Noguchi Museum NY..(youtube)

  • Yoshiko Yoshiko Yamaguchi and Isamu Noguchi and Isamu Noguchi
    Yoshiko Yamaguchi - Isamu Noguchi’s ex-wife .. an international diva who became a politican and has become a passionate advocate for Palestinian causes.

  • Edward Said on Israel occupation (youtube)

  • Gae Aulenti, Lebbeus Woods – Passing of Two Architects

    November 3rd, 2012
  • Gae Aulenti
    (photo via)

    Gae Aulenti, Musée d’Orsay Architect, Dies at 84

    Gae Aulenti, a provocative Italian architect and designer who most notably converted a Paris train station into the Musée d’Orsay, died on Wednesday at her home in Milan.

  • Lebbeus Woods 1940-2012

    Lebbeus Woods died this morning at the age of 72. Woods was
    an anomaly in the contemporary architecture scene, producing
    work almost exclusively in the form of architectural
    drawings (in great volume) and sustaining a distinctive
    reputation as a visionary who, by inhabiting the lofty
    theoretical stratosphere of imagining over constructing
    buildings– a space so distanced from the vitiating
    constraints of capital — remained something of an
    uncorrupted, almost sanctified presence in the field. -Alan Sondheim (via netbehaviour)

    The Super Splice

    Architecture and war are not incompatible. Architecture is war. War is architecture. I am at war with my time, with history, with all authority that resides in fixed and frightened forms. I am one of millions who do not fit in, who have no home, no family, no doctrine, no firm place to call my own, no known beginning or end, no “sacred and primordial site.” I declare war on all icons and finalities, on all histories that would chain me with my own falseness, my own pitiful fears. I know only moments, and lifetimes that are as moments, and forms that appear with infinite strength, then “melt into air.” I am an architect, a constructor of worlds, a sensualist who worships the flesh, the melody, a silhouette against the darkening sky. I cannot know your name. Nor you can know mine. Tomorrow, we begin together the construction of a city.

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    Lebbeus Woods, radical architect,LA Obit

  • Without Walls: An Interview with Lebbeus Woods (Bee’s Architecture blog)

  • Sweater Hereafter

    October 5th, 2012
  • My Knitted Boyfriend is a cushion with a story. A cushion with a personality. A cushion to kiss! (See vimeo.. fun stuff) Design by Noortje De Keijzer.

    Film still from The Sweet Hereafter.. (Trailer – directed by Atom Egoyan)

  • Rosemarie Trockel

  • Sad Hispster is sad

  • Knitted Sweaters for Trees

  • Gaudi by Teshigahara

    June 25th, 2012


    Antoni Gaudi Full film directed by Hiroshi Teshigahara

    Gaudi Made Me Realize the Lines Between the Arts Are Insignificant – Hiroshi Teshigahara

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    Gaudi not only had a profound impact on Teshigahara’s work, but it was Gaudi who planted the seed of a cross-disciplinary approach to the arts. “Gaudi worked beyond the borders of various arts,” said Teshigahara, “and made me feel that the world in which I was living still left a great many possibilities.”

    Nature and landscape were of central importance to Hiroshi Teshigahara, even as a young boy. He was born in Tokyo, son of Sofu Teshigahara, founder and grand master of the Sogetsu School of ikebana. Sofu championed the idea of ikebana as an art form rather than a decorative craft, and he bucked tradition by including materials besides flowers in his work.

    As Dore Ashton explains in an excellent essay on the Criterion website, when Hiroshi Teshigahara was a schoolboy, Japan’s cities were firebombed during the Second World War. He “returned to a landscape of bleak ruins.” Teshigahara’s generation “was charged with building a way to exist in the desperate circumstances they had inherited,” says Ashton. “Prominent survivors of the prewar avant-garde, who had spent all their youth in Paris, exhorted young artists to build a totally new culture, expunging all memory of the militaristic milieu of their childhood.”

    Calvet Chair Antoni Gaudi

    “If any film could be described as an architectural symphony, it is Hiroshi Teshigahara’s 1984 movie ANTONIO GAUDI. Much of the imagery in GAUDI is nothing less than astounding in its beauty and boldness, and the blending of a neo-Gothic mysticism and grandeur with an Art Nouveau line and a surreal apprehension of the power of nature. The erotic connotations of much of the work are so blunt as to be almost shocking.”– Stephen Holden, The New York Times

  • Hiroshi Teshigahara -(Previous post – The Face of Another)

    Elephant Chairs

    April 10th, 2012

    Dorothea Tanning
    Rainy Day Canapé, 1970, Philadelphia Museum of Art

    Dozen works by Tanning now on view in LACMA’s special exhibition In Wonderland: The Surrealist Adventures of Women Artists in Mexico and the United States.

    See Dorothea with Max Ernst here. (Scroll down)

  • Six images from Steve Faletti

  • Alexander Calder

    Everyday thing

    Rare “Elephant” armchair, designed by Emile-Jacques Ruhlmann in 1926. It sold at auction in December 2010 for $290,500.

  • Chorus of Charis See some fanatastic chairs by famous artists from here.

    Dragon chair looks like an Elephant

    The Man from Rio – Niemeyer & Delerue

    March 12th, 2012

    The Man from Rio

    This fast-moving spoof of Bond-type movies features striking location photography of Rio de Janeiro, Oscar Niemeyer’s nascent Brasília and Paris of the time. In 1964 the film was nominated for the Oscar for Best Writing, Story and Screenplay.

    Jean Paul Belmondo

  • Oscar Niemeyer + a memory of Biennale at Sao Paulo (previous post)

  • Birthday of George Delerue who did soundtrack for the Man from Rio. Born March 12 1925, Delerue was a great composer of film scores.
    Previous post -George Deleerue Youtube La Tendresse (4 clips from The Contempt, Two English Girls, Jules et Jim & Hiroshima Mon Amour linked)

    Eiko Ishioka R.I.P

    January 28th, 2012


    (Mishima by Paul Schrader)

    NYtimes

    Eiko Ishioka, Multifaceted Designer and Oscar Winner, Dies at 73

    LAtimes

    The Tokyo native who later moved to New York began her convention-defying career in Japanese advertising but eventually expanded it to include design work for Broadway, the movies and Cirque du Soleil.

    Eiko Ishioka
    石岡 瑛子, Ishioka Eiko, July 12, 1939, Tokyo – January 21, 2012, Tokyo

    In a career marked by great versatility, Ishioka won a Grammy Award in 1986 for best album package as art director for Miles Davis’ “Tutu.”
    Her sets and costumes for David Henry Hwang’s Broadway play “M. Butterfly” earned her two Tony Award nominations in 1988.

  • Faye Dunaway
    1) Eiko Ishioka (with Faye Dunaway) for Japanese department store, Parco

    2) Faye Dunaway Peels an Egg - (youtube)

  • The Fall
    See The Fall – trailer (Previous post – Captive Girls)

    Our first marriage from the Fall (youtube)

    Bjork Cocoon (youtube)

    Eiko Ishioka filmography

    A Tribute to Ishioka