+

R I P Robert Pirsig – Zen & the Art of Motorcycle Maintenace + Lila

April 24th, 2017
  • 1aBobpirsig2

    Robert M. Pirsig

    “His well known book ‘Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance’ was rejected by 121 publishers.”

  • Persig 1abob20

    Early photos

    Lila (wiki)

    NYtimes obit

    One of Mr. Pirsig’s central ideas is that so-called ordinary experience and so-called transcendent experience are actually one and the same — and that Westerners only imagine them as separate realms because Plato, Aristotle and other early philosophers came to believe that they were.

    But Plato and Aristotle were wrong, Mr. Pirsig said. Worse, the mind-body dualism, soldered into Western consciousness by the Greeks, fomented a kind of civil war of the mind — stripping rationality of its spiritual underpinnings and spirituality of its reason, and casting each into false conflict with the other.

    In his part gnomic, part mechanic’s style, Mr. Pirsig’s narrator declares that the real world is a seamless continuum of the material and metaphysical.

    “The Buddha, the Godhead,” he writes, “resides quite as comfortably in the circuits of a digital computer or the gears of a cycle transmission as he does at the top of a mountain or in the petals of a flower.”

    Derek Walcott, Nobel Prize Poet & Playwright Dies at 87

    March 17th, 2017
  • <> <> <> 1aDomeros
    January 23, 1930, Castries, Saint Lucia
    Died: March 17, 2017, Saint Lucia
    NYtimes obit

    Derek Walcott, whose intricately metaphorical poetry captured the physical beauty of the Caribbean, the harsh legacy of colonialism and the complexities of living and writing in two cultural worlds, bringing him a Nobel Prize in Literature, died early Friday morning at his home near Gros Islet in St. Lucia. He was 87.

    BBC obit

    His great skill, and gift to literature, was the way in which he used his unique poetic voice to explore and explain the world from a largely unseen perspective.
    He was never parochial or nationalistic, quite the opposite in fact. Derek Walcott was a master at using the specific to identify common ground and universal themes, illuminating both the individual and the collective.

    Walcott wrote dozens of books of poetry and plays, among them his epic poem Omeros and his Obie-winning drama, Dream on Monkey Mountain.

  • From Canada (Warlus) The Stranger who has loved you.

  • 1aDerekMarkStrand
    (Mark Strand, Joseph Brodsky, Adam Zagajewski, and Derek Walcott in Brodsky’s garden)

    via

  • 1aDerekWallcot
    Seen here with Seamus Heaney in Dún Laoghaire DART station, 1989 [photo: Matt Kavanagh]

    Brilliant poets find one another: their world is very small even though their influence is wide and deep. Being a self-described “country boy” didn’t mean that Derek was cut off from so-called literary society. Derek’s closest poet friends, the Russian-born Joseph Brodsky and Irish poet Seamus Heaney, wrote about the pain and fascinating distance and longing that comes with being in exile.

    A Mighty Poet has died (New Yorker)

    Love After Love
    The time will come
    when, with elation
    you will greet yourself arriving
    at your own door, in your own mirror
    and each will smile at the other’s welcome,

    and say, sit here. Eat.
    You will love again the stranger who was your self.
    Give wine. Give bread. Give back your heart
    to itself, to the stranger who has loved you

    all your life, whom you ignored
    for another, who knows you by heart.
    Take down the love letters from the bookshelf,

    the photographs, the desperate notes,
    peel your own image from the mirror.
    Sit. Feast on your life.
    Derek Walcott

  • Moring Paramin Derek Walcott and Peter Doig (See art by Peter Doig)

  • 1aDerekSontag

    Photograph: From left: Tatyana Tolstaya; Mark Strand; Susan Sontag; Richard Locke, chairman of the School of the Arts Writing Division, and Derek Walcott.

  • Photo of Oscar Wilde by Sugimoto, Happy St Patrick’s Day – 2017

    March 17th, 2017
  • 1eileenblue

    Eileen Gray the Irish Designer

  • Sinead O’Connor 1BowenSinead1992
    Sinead O’Connor photo by Jane Bown

  • Oscar Wilde 1aHiroshiOscarwilde

    Photo by Hiroshi Sugimoto (via)


  • quotes

  • Frank McCourt

  • High Hopes in Ireland (see Irish art here)

    Breakfast on Pluto

    The wind that shakes the Barley

    Happy St Patrick’s day!

    Paterson – A Musical, Visual and Poetic Experience

    March 14th, 2017
  • Paterson 1abPatersoncover

  • A Musical, Visual and Poetic Experience based on Paterson by William Carlos Williams

    Williams said: “The Falls let out a roar as it crashed upon the rocks at its base. In the imagination this roar is a speech or a voice, a speech in particular; it is the poem itself that is the answer. “

  • 1AdlerFred

    The Boxman, Abe Kobo & His Collaboration with Teshigahara

    March 7th, 2017
  • 1AbeSuna
    (Woman in the Dunes)

  • 1abBoxman

  • Pitfall pitfall

    1abe_takemitsu
    (Teshigahara, Abe Kobo, Toru Takemitsu)

  • Abe Kobo (wiki) (March 7, 1924 – January 22, 1993)

  • Tashigahara (The Face of Another)1abeFace

    RIP Dore Ashton, an Art Historian who embraced Modernism dies at 88.

    February 3rd, 2017
  • Dore Ashton 1ashton-obit-superJumbo

    NYtimes Dore Ashton who embraced and inhabited moernism dies at 88.

    1aDoreAsh

  • 1ashton-books-640

    Art News obit

  • Dore A 1AliceNeelDore
    Portrait of Dore Ashton by Alice Neel

  • On the Influence of Gorky

    Ashton took her notes from Franz Kafka who believed that an “artist was a man of many lives, many potential personalities, and many different relationships.” This outlook on artists is a uniquely modern one. Many artists in the Pre-modern era fit this description, but it was of very little consequence, before the Impressionists, how artists adjusted themselves to fit into society. According to Ashton, it was Arshile Gorky who, upon landing in New York in 1925, made it not only fashionable but acceptable for other New York artists to feel a real sense of liberty and experimentation, to wear different masks when it suited them.

    “He was,” wrote Ashton, “at once, a painter who refused to put a face on his forms and a painter who, at times – moved by sentimental memories – assigned associations to certain paintings.” These meandering tendencies were not those of an artist without direction or focus, but of a man who fully recognized the wealth of form available to the imaginative eye. Ashton believes that Gorky set the bar for those younger New York artists who during the pre-WWII years did lack direction and focus.

    Olivier Assayas & Hou Hsiao Hsien, & Portrait of Ava Gardner by Man Ray

    January 25th, 2017
  • Olivier A. 1assayasjournal
    Happy birthday Olivier Assayas!

  • Olivier- Polanski collaboration here.

  • True Story AssayasHo-

    Olivier Assayas and Hou Hsiao Hsien

    A portrait of Hou Hsiao Hsien by Olivier Assayas here.

    Assayas, who while a critic at Cahiers du cinéma had championed Hou long before it was in vogue to do so, followed the master filmmaker around his native Taiwan. Released just after Assayas’ breakout Irma Vep, this intimate documentary profiles a director who was largely unknown on the global scene in the late 90s. HHH: A Portrait of Hou Hsiao-Hsien remains the most thorough look at one of the most revered living directors.

  • Assayas and Mia Hansen Love (husband and wife filmmakers)
    Both received awards in Europe for best director in 2016 (Mia in Berlin and Assayas in Cannes)

  • Assayas Olivier Assayas on Ingmar Bergman on Bergman (I don’t think this book is translated into English.)

    When I did Conversations with Bergman it was an extraordinary experience for a young film-maker to be confronted with one of the great masters. (via)

    Olivier Assayas on Ingmar Bergman (repost)

  • 1aAvaMan-Ray_150_-1950
    Portrait of Ava Gardner by Man Ray.
    Ava Gardner.(December 24, 1922 – January 25, 1990)
    (She said “Elizabeth Taylor was pretty.. I was beautiful..” )

    Film Adaptations of Parades’ End by Ford Madoxx Ford & Disgrace by J.M. Coetzee

    December 16th, 2016
  • 1afbebedict
    Benedict Cumberbatch was terrific in Parades’ End. (On Parades’ End Cumberbatch on youtube here)

    Parades’ End is a Novel by Ford Madoxx Ford, script by Tom Stoppard.

  • 1ajoyce-pound-ford-quinn
    James Joyce, Ezra Pound, Ford Maddox Ford and John Quinn

    Dec 17 birthday of Ford Madox Ford.

    via Wiki.. Hemingway devoted a chapter of his Parisian memoir A Moveable Feast to an encounter with Ford at a café in Paris during the early 1920s. He describes Ford “as upright as an ambulatory, well clothed, up-ended hogshead.”
    Ford had an affair with Jean Rhys . it ended badly..

    Ford Madoxx Ford

  • J. M. Coetzee1acoetzeebooks
    Coetzee completed a Master’s thesis on Ford Madox Ford

    John Malkovich 1acoetzeedisgrace
    Disgrace

    Review of Disgrace by Roger Ebert

    I awaited the closing scenes of “Disgrace” with a special urgency, because the story had gripped me deeply but left me with no idea how it would end. None — and I really cared. This is such a rare movie.

    “Un Homme de Fragment”, The Last Laugh of the Melancholy Philosopher Emil Cioran

    December 1st, 2016
  • <> 1acioranflickr
    The Philosopher of Failure: Emil Cioran’s Heights of Despair
    -By Costica Bradatan

    On Two types of societies –

    All societies are bad; but there are degrees, I admit, and if I have chosen this one, it is because I can distinguish among the nuances of trumpery” .

    Emil Cioran (1911–1995) was a Romanian-born French philosopher and author of some two dozen books of savage, unsettling beauty. He is an essayist in the best French tradition, and even though French was not his native tongue, many think him among the finest writers in that language. His writing style is whimsical, unsystematic, fragmentary; he is celebrated as one of the great masters of aphorism. But the “fragment” was for Cioran more than a writing style: it was a vocation and a way of life; he called himself “un homme de fragment.”

  • Cioran

    Emil Cioran (wiki) The Melancholy thinker..

    Regarding God, Cioran has noted that “without Bach, God would be a complete second rate figure” and that “Bach’s music is the only argument proving the creation of the Universe cannot be regarded a complete failure”.

    William H. Gass called Cioran’s work “a philosophical romance on the modern themes of alienation, absurdity, boredom, futility, decay, the tyranny of history, the vulgarities of change, awareness as agony, reason as disease”. (via wki)

    (repost, see other philosophers)

  • 1acioran10

    10 Delightfully Surly Books for the Relentless Pessimist

    (via)

  • 1acioranem

    A further glimpse into Cioran’s peculiar manner of political thinking, in a letter he sent to Mircea Eliade in 1935: “My formula for all things political,” he writes, “is the following: fight wholeheartedly for things in which you do not believe.” Not that such a confession brings much clarity to Cioran’s involvement, but it places his “ravings” within a certain psychological perspective. This split personality characterized the later Cioran, and it makes sense, for a philosopher who sees the world as a failure of grand proportions, to mock the cosmic order (and himself in the process) by pretending that there is some meaning where there is none. You know that everything is pointless, but by behaving as if it wasn’t, you manage to articulate your dissent and undermine the designs of the “evil demiurge.” And you do that with boundless irony and humor, which is rigorously meant to counter the divine farce. He who laughs last laughs hardest.

    Boneyard and Butterfly – Nabokov/November 2016

    November 16th, 2016
  • 1aboneyardChristianM

    Boneyard, 1990 by Christian Marclay
    hydrostone casts of telephone receivers, in 750 parts
    dimensions variable

    Nabakov -vladimir-nabokov_3

    Here something interesting to read about Nabokov -

    Name these children album..

    Love Lasts Forever the Poet/Zen Master Leonard Cohen said, His last Album was “You Want it Darker”

    November 11th, 2016
  • 1abcohen

    photo via Cohencentric
    See the photo of Leonard Cohen’s last album here and explore this mega Leonard Cohen site.

  • Can’t imagine a world without Leonard Cohen, a deep void we must face in “Future” and hear his song again.

    Lonard Cohen dead at 82 (Rolling Stone)

    Yeats and Federico Garcia Lorca were Cohen’s favorite poets.

    Long time ago I was about 15 in my hometown of Montreal, I was rumbling through….or rambling as you say down here. We say “rumbling” .Actually we don’t say that at all. I was rumbling through this bookstore in Montreal. And I came upon this old book, a second-hand book of poems by a Spanish poet. I opened it up and I read these lines : “I want to pass through the arches of Elvira, to see your thighs and begin weeping”. Well that certainly was a refreshing sentiment. I began my own search for those arches those thighs and those tears….Another line “The morning through fistfuls of ants at my face” It’s a terrible idea. But this was a universe I understood thoroughly and I began to pursue it, I began to follow it and I began to live in it. And now these many years later, it is my great privilege to be able to offer my tiny homage to this great Spanish poet, the aniversary of whose assassination was celebrated two years ago. He was killed by the Civil Guards in Spain in 1936. But my real homage to this poet was naming my own daughter Lorca. It was Federico Garcia Lorca. I set one of his poems to music and translated it. He called it “Little Vienese Waltz”. My song is called “Take this Waltz”.

  • Cohen and Dylan 1abobcohen

  • With Sonny Rollings – Who by Fire

    More from Leonard Cohen Archive.

    The Hollow Men – Photo of T.S. Eliot & Ted Hughes + Willem Dafoe as Tom in Tom & Viv

    September 26th, 2016
  • 1aeliot-his-wife-valerie-012

    Ted Hughes and Eliot

    TS Eliot, his wife Valerie and Ted Hughes at – in Hughes’s words – ‘one of the champagne and guinness parties’ that Faber used to throw

    Photograph: Faber Archive

  • This is the way the world ends
    This is the way the world ends
    This is the way the world ends
    Not with a bang but a whimper.

    The Hollow Men

    The Hollow Men
    Mistah Kurtz-he dead
    A penny for the Old Guy

  • M8DTOAN EC002

    Tom and Viv

  • The Fraught Friendship of T. S. Eliot and Groucho Marx (New Yorker)