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Elizabeth Bishop & Robert Lowell – Turning Pain into Art

October 6th, 2018
  • Robert Lowell and Elizabeth Bishop – Tragic Muses

  • Elizabeth Bishop
    February 8, 1911 – October 6, 1979

    Biography 0f Bishop 2017 (Elizabeth Bishop: A Miracle for Breakfast
    by Megan Marshall)

    One Art – see her painting + many great links (previous post)

  • Reaching for the Moon – Brazilian film on Elizabeth Bishop (trailer)

    RIP Paul Virilio, An Aesthetic Philosopher of Bunker Archeology

    September 26th, 2018
  • Frieze

    How Philosopher Paul Virilio (1932–2018) Spoke to an Age of Acceleration and Total War


  • Claude Parent and Paul Virilio


    via


  • Paul Virilio (wiki) (French: [viʁiljo]; 4 January 1932 – 10 September 2018)[3] was a French cultural theorist, urbanist, and aesthetic philosopher. He is best known for his writings about technology as it has developed in relation to speed and power, with diverse references to architecture, the arts, the city and the military.
    According to two geographers, Virilio was a “historian of warfare, technology and photography, a philosopher of architecture, military strategy and cinema, and a politically engaged provocative commentator on history, terrorism, mass media and human-machine relations

  • Bunker Archeology

    Magdalene Jetelova
    – in which she laser-projected select quotations from, what else, Paul Virilio’s Bunker Archaeology onto the half-submerged fortifications found scattered along Normandy’s beaches.

    Magdalene Jetalova (Czech artist)

  • RIP Annette Michelson, Pioneer Film Critic, Co-Founder of “October”

    September 18th, 2018

  • Annette Michelson (photo via)

  • Art News – Annette Michelsonk Pioneering Film Critic, Co-founder October dies at 96.


  • Photo by Fung Lin Hall

  • RIP Tom Clark, Poet, Biographer & Beyond the Pale Blogger

    August 20th, 2018
  • Tom Clark, 2010. Poet – photo by John Sarsgard

  • Beyond the Pale an extraordinary blog by Tom Clark.

    Tom Clark Renowned Poet and Biographer dies in North Berkeley traffic collision.

    Jacket Interview
    (Tom Clark thought Ron Padgett was a far superior poet of my generation.. )
    Ron Padgett and Paterson – (scroll down)

  • Samuel Beckett – My Family with extraordinary photos from Jakarta Indonesia here (from Tom Clark’s blog)

  • The Mystic Masseur Nobel Prized Author V.S. Naipaul Dies at 85

    August 12th, 2018

  • Portrait by Paul Emsley at the National Portrait Gallery

    The World is What it is (The Authorized Biography of V.S. Naipaul, Patrick French, 2008 – reviewed by Agog)

    Guardian obit

    VS Naipaul, Nobel prize-winning British author, dies aged 85.

    Ian Buruma on Naipaul (the Poet of the Displaced)

    An Appraisal- NYtimes..

    V.S.Naipaul wiki
    5 things Probably Didn’t know about V.S.Naipaul

    1) He had a nervous breakdown while studying at Oxford, and spent all his money on a trip to Spain
    2)He wrote his first story collection in five weeks (read more from the above link)


  • Pat and V.S Naipaul

    V.S.Naipal and Harold Pinter here.

  • Kureishi Novel echoes Life of V. S.Naipaul

  • Paris Review

  • Naipaul’s gentle side ..

  • INTERVIEWER
    Do you ever wonder what would have become of you if you had stayed in Trinidad?
    NAIPAUL
    I would have killed myself. A friend of mine did—out of stress, I think. He was a boy of mixed race. A lovely boy, and very bright. It was a great waste.
    INTERVIEWER
    Is he the boy that you mention in the introduction to A House for Mr. Biswas?
    NAIPAUL
    Yes, he is the boy I had in mind. We shared an admiration for each other. His death was terrible.

  • MSDMYMA EC002
    MYSTIC MASSEUR, Ayesha Dharker, Om Puri, 2001(c) Think Film. . Merchant Ivory production..
    story by V.S. Naipal.
    Om Puri in Mystic Masseur

    Ken Russell, Kafka and Tom Stoppard Born on July 3.

    July 3rd, 2018
  • 1aaDevilsKen
    Ken Russell July 3rd, 1927 (The Mad music lover – previous post)

  • 1aaCrumbKafka
    (Robert Crumb – Introducing Kafka)

    Kafka Imagining (previous post)


  • Harold Pinter and Tom Stoppard photographed by Arnold Newman
    Both Tom Stoppard and Franz Kafka were born in Czechoslovakia (Czech Republic today).

  • Donald Hall – Work, Love, Build a House and Die – (1928-2018)

    June 25th, 2018
  • 1aaDonaldJaneKenyon
    (Donald Hall and Jane Kenyon)

    LA Times obit

    The joy and tragedy of his life were his years with Kenyon, his second wife. They met in 1969, when she was his student at the University of Michigan. By the mid-’70s, they were married and living together at Eagle Creek, fellow poets enjoying a fantasy of mind and body — of sex, work and homemaking.

    “We sleep, we make love, we plant a tree, we walk up and down/eating lunch,” he wrote.

    Paris Review

    Donald Hall, Who Gave His Life to Work and Eros.
    He was also very funny and very particular (“I love chicken salad, egg salad as long as it has onion, turkey and salami. I don’t like tuna”). The horrors of antiquity—a “black fatigue,” congestive heart failure, “a hundred and fifty colonoscopies,” walking more slowly with his “rollator,” falling down, the loss of words—did not exclude joy and love.

  • New Yorker -Between Solitude and Loneliness (Hall’s short Story)

    1aaHall-One_Illo

  • “Work, love, build a house, and die,” he wrote. “But build a house.” – Donald Hall

  • Poetry foundation

    Often compared favorably with such writers as James Dickey, Robert Bly, and James Wright, Hall used simple, direct language to evoke surrealistic imagery. In addition to his poetry, Hall built a respected body of prose that includes essays, short fiction, plays, and children’s books. Hall, who lived on the New Hampshire farm he visited in summers as a boy, was also noted for the anthologies he has edited and is a popular teacher, speaker, and reader of his own poems.

  • Being There – Jerzy Kosinski, Hal Ashby & Peter Sellers

    June 14th, 2018
  • Kosinski EN_00909363_2747
    Photo via Jerzy Kosinski
    Who was Jerzy Kosinski? (Previous post)

    Jerzy Kosinski was born on June 14, 1933. He was an award-winning Polish-American novelist, best known for the novels The Painted Bird (1965) and Being There (1971), the latter of which was adapted into a film in 1979.

    <> 1abeingthereX2

    1ashby

    Hal Ashby directed Being There.

  • Philip Roth on Jerzy Kosinski –

    In the end, I don’t understand Jerzy Kosinski. At some level, he must have judged his life as successful. Using his talent, wits, boldness and determination, he went far, if you consider the boy growing up under the most menacing of shadows. Was he happy? There is so much darkness in his novels, I wonder how much brightness there was in his life (inside him, in the place he kept hidden). I am left with a sense of pity, which I’m sure he would not want me to feel. He would prefer respect. And I can grant him that.

  • Jerzey

    David Foster Wallace described Steps as a “collection of unbelievably creepy little allegorical tableaux done in a terse elegant voice that’s like nothing else anywhere ever”. Wallace continued in praise: “Only Kafka’s fragments get anywhere close to where Kosiński goes in this book, which is better than everything else he ever did combined.

    Polish Children

  • Rachel Carson – The Poet of the Sea

    May 27th, 2018
  • 1a23carson4-

    The Right Way to Remember Rachel Carson

    Not until the end of her life did she write the work for which she is now known. Before then, she had always thought of herself as a poet of the sea.
    By Jill Lepore

    Rachel Carson (wiki) 1aaCarsonRachel

    Rachel Carson org.

    Remembering Roth with Kitaj, Milan Kundera, RIP Philip Roth

    May 23rd, 2018
  • 1aaKitajPhilipRoth
    New Yorker obit

    Artnet (see the portrait)
    Kitaj

  • Guardian obit
    Writer Friends paying tribute (guardian)

  • 1aKunderaRothP
    Roth with Milan Kundera

    The New Yorker the Book of Laughter
    (Philip Roth and his friends. By Claudia Roth Pierpont)

    Playfulness and humor were also crucial to Roth’s regard for the work of Milan Kundera, to whom “The Ghost Writer” is dedicated.

  • Roth’s work speaks, at heart, of his crazy, complete love for America. But it also says how fragile this America is, vulnerable to its own ghosts, in constant freefall. It’s that ambivalence, that anxious love, demanding and sometimes desperate, that distinguished him from the other writers of the American pastoral—Mailer, Malamud, Bellow. And its that love that gave Roth such a singular place in the landscape of American and world literature. I remember the day I spent with him, the day of Donald Trump’s inauguration. We watched the ceremony, live on CNN. I observed him surreptitiously. I listened to his commentary. What struck me was his mix of disgust, malice, and satisfaction, as a novelist, at having predicted and described it all in advance. —Bernard-Henri Lévy

  • 1aaKunderaRothVera
    (Kundera, Vera Kundera and Roth)

    Tablet magazine

    Tablet reached the home of Milan Kundera, the great Czech novelist and friend of Philip Roth, in Paris. Kundera wasn’t feeling well.
    After a formative visit to Eastern Europe in 1972, Roth came to champion a group of writers, including Kundera, who became known as “Writers from the Other Europe,” the name of the series of novels Roth shepherded into print in America through the 1980s. Through these publications, English-language audiences were introduced to the work of Kundera, Bruno Schulz, Tadeusz Borowski, Daniol Kiš, Joseph Brodsky, Bohumil Hrabal, and György Konrád, among other writers working under the tyranny of Soviet occupation.
    Above all, Kundera and Roth’s was a friendship between two great novelists, one of whom understood love and the other who understood anxiety, and both of whom were extremely funny on the page.
    Vera Kundera, Milan’s wife, had one comment she wanted everyone to hear: “Those cretins in Stockholm never gave him his prize,” she said, adding, “those cretins.”

    Baby P. Roth 1a-10-mois_c250

    “I don’t wish to be a slave any longer to the stringent exigencies of literature”
    (Interview -via)

    Wiki

    In 1990, Roth married his longtime companion, English actress Claire Bloom. In 1994 they separated, and in 1996 Bloom published a memoir, Leaving a Doll’s House, that described the couple’s marriage in detail, much of which was unflattering to Roth. Certain aspects of I Married a Communist have been regarded by critics as veiled rebuttals to the accusations in Bloom’s memoir.

    Eight of Philip Roth’s novels and short stories have been adapted as films: Goodbye, Columbus; Portnoy’s Complaint; The Human Stain; The Dying Animal, adapted as Elegy; The Humbling; Indignation; and American Pastoral. In addition, The Ghost Writer was adapted for television in 1984.[55] In 2014, filmmaker Alex Ross Perry made Listen Up Philip, which was influenced by Roth’s art.

  • Would there ever be another writer like Roth? (Paris Review)

    The Right Stuff – Tom Wolf who Coined the Me Decade Dies at 88

    May 15th, 2018
  • 1aastTomWolfStyle

    Best selling author and genre breaking journalist dies at 88. (NPR obit)

  • 1aastraTomWolf
    Louis Menand (New Yorker) Tom Wolf, Sage of Status Anxiety

    Satire associates aspiration with fatuousness and newness with faddishness, and Tom Wolfe was skilled at making those reductions.

    Satire is highbrow populism. (Hence Wolfe’s diatribes against modernist art and architecture.)

  • 1aaSamchuck

    (Sam Shepard played Chuck Y )

    SF Gate obit

    Philip Kaufman, the San Francisco filmmaker who directed the adaptation of “The Right Stuff,” also wrote the screenplay for the 1983 film.
    “The book was such a great piece of writing that in a way it could not be put into a film,” Kaufman said. “He was going for a spirit of something that maybe all people have in common. That ineffable quality that can’t even be mentioned. It took me five years to make the movie.
    “Tom saw it at a private screening,” Kaufman added. “There is a scene where Sam Shepard (as Chuck Yeager) is arriving by horseback in the high desert like a cowboy in a leather jacket. He sees this small test airplane sitting alone in the desert being fueled. Everyone who has tried to ride this plane has died, and now he is looking at this plane, the bronc that can’t be broken. It is, in a way, the meeting of the Western in the movies with the future.
    “When Tom saw this he just started applauding, I am told. When the movie was over, he asked if he could see it again right now, all the way through. He loved it.”

  • 1aaHunterTomW
    (Pictured in 1996 with the writer Hunter S Thompson at the 25th anniversary party of Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas)

    Tom W on Hunter (Youtube)

    Tom Wolf wiki

    Of particular influence was his professor Marshall Fishwick, a teacher of American studies, educated at Yale. More in the tradition of anthropology than literary scholarship, Fishwick taught his students to look at the whole of a culture, including those elements considered profane.[citation needed] Wolfe’s undergraduate thesis, entitled “A Zoo Full of Zebras: Anti-Intellectualism in America,” evinced his fondness for words and aspirations toward cultural criticism. Wolfe graduated cum laude in 1951.

    Astronaut Scott Kelly to Tom Wolf (Vanity Fair)

    Doris Lessing Loved Cactus – Happy Mother’s Day – 2018

    May 12th, 2018
  • 1aaDorisIdaKarphoto
    Doris Lessing (Photo by Ida Kar)

  • Doris Lessing – A Retrospective.

  • Doris Lessing – A mother much misunderstood


  • Doris and her mother – a capable and talented woman who was extremely frustrated.

    Doris Lessing archive