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Life is Elsewhere – Easter Sunday is April Fool’s Day in 2018

March 31st, 2018
  • Milan Kundera was born on April 1. (His first novel was called The Joke.)

    Life is Elsewhere Praha Man Photo collage by Fung Lin Hall.
    The above image is a photo collage of an outdoor art installation from a street near Malostranska station in Prague. The statue of Sigmund Freud hanging by one hand by David Cerny – Czech Sculptor. *
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    Philip Kaufman saw Miss Julie on stage and cast Lena Olin in The Unbearable Lightness of Being for his adaptation of Milan Kundera’s most popular novel.
    Daniel Day Lewis and Lena Olin

  • Easter Sunday – 2018

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    The Rabbit knows how to relax.

    Pool Bunny 1Poolbunny Fung Lin Hall (See Hotel lobbies in New Mexico and William James)

  • Arizona Tales

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    The Good, The Bad and The Rabbit

  • Rabbit by Henri Rousseau, Durer and others here.

  • Happy St Patrick’s Day

    March 16th, 2018
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    Seamus Heaney ( Putting Feelings into Words)


  • Photo of Samuel Beckett by Steve Schapiro

    Beckett was asked by a reporter how a small country like Ireland could have produced so many great writers since the last half of the nineteenth century.

    “It’s the priests and the British, Beckett replied tersely. “They have buggered us into existence. After all, when you are in the last bloody ditch, there is nothing left but to sing.” (Page 282, A biography of Samuel Beckett by Deirdre Bair.)

    Samuel Beckett Archive

    Digital image by Fung Lin Hall 1aladysaguaro
    (Kitch invades the sacred land or Our Lady of the Desert)

    Happy St Patick’s Day (See Frank McCourt and other Irish luminaries)

  • High Hopes in Ireland (see Irish art here)

    The wind that shakes the Barley

  • Happy New (Y)ear of Earth Dog – 2018 – Communicative, Serious & Responsible

    February 15th, 2018
  • Happy New (Y)ear of Earth Dog! starting February 16, 2018 to February 4, 2019.
    (Earth dog is Communicative, serious, and responsible in work)

    Spike loved Maria Callas and his family love and miss him forever.

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    Ellis began working on the book in 2010 after Kubrick’s death by canine lymphoma as a way of working through his grief over the dog’s death

    Independent filmmaker Sean Ellis (previous post- Metro Manila to Prague)

  • James Dean ‘s dog here.

  • Dog by Ed Ruscha Ed Ruscha Dog

    Oof oof and various cheeses

    Monty andmontymonty Monty Socrates
    Read how Monty Socrates found his family and his brother and sister.

    Best in show – A film clip + fun dog photos and a link to 8 ways to prepare your pets for war.

    East & West, Photos of Natsume Soseki & A Photo of Shimura Takashi & Ingmar Bergman

    February 11th, 2018
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    Michiyo Aratama from Kokoro

  • Natsume Soseki was born on February 9, 1867

    Natsume Soseki - Kokoro (adapted by Kon Ichikawa)

    Natsume Soseki (previous post)

    Kon Ichikawa archive here.

  • Shimura 1aBergmanShimura Takashi and Ingmar Bergman
    (During the awarding of the Selznick-Goldlorbeer-award on 29th June 1961 in Berlin on accasion of the Berlinale Film Festival. )

    RIP Shimura Takashi – Feb 11, 1982 (Shimura appeared in 21 of Akira Kurosawa’s 30 films)

  • (Ingmar Bergman archive here)

  • Happy birthday Jeon Do-yeon!


    Jeon Do Yeon with Jia Zhangke and Gael Garcia Bernal (Cannes film festival 2014)

  • Soseki 1aglensoseki
    and Glenn Gould

    Soseki was Glenn’s favorite author.

  • Sorekara (top)Natsume Soseki Soseki as the face on 1000 Japanese yen (bottom).
    1000_yen_natsume_soseki

  • Photos of William S. Burroughs + Naked Lunch & Drugstore Cowboy

    February 5th, 2018
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    William S. Burroughs and Jack Kerouac – photo by Allen Ginsberg

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  • Our Paranoid Friend had a dinner with Susan Sontag

  • Naked L. Trio 1a3NakedLunch
    With David Cronenberg and William S Burroughs

    Peter Weller is now an Italian Renaissance art hisotrian. (see previous post)

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    (via)

    Initially Gus wanted Tom Waits for the role that went to Matt Dillon. Drugstore Cowboy was based on a true story. William S. Burroughs changed the profession for his part to that of a priest. He only wanted to work for one day so they shot everything in a day.

    Gus Vant Sant

  • Uncle Howard -Howard Brookner made a documentary of William S. Burroughs.

  • J.G. Ballard 1aballard.william-burroughs.1988
    More about this..here

  • RIP Ursula K. Le Guin (October 21, 1929 – January 22, 2018)

    January 23rd, 2018
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    Time obit

    Acclaimed Feminist Science Fiction Writer Ursula K. Le Guin Dies at 88

    Ursula K. Le Guin(wiki)

    Le Guin was influenced by fantasy writers including J. R. R. Tolkien, by science fiction writers including Philip K. Dick (who was in her high school class, though they did not know each other),by central figures of Western literature such as Leo Tolstoy, Virgil and the Brontë sisters, by feminist writers such as Virginia Woolf, by children’s literature such as Alice in Wonderland, The Wind in the Willows, The Jungle Book, by Norse mythology, and by books from the Eastern tradition such as the Tao Te Ching.

    Ursula K Le Guin (homepage)

    What inspired you to be a writer?

    Learning to write, at five.

    What were your childhood & youth like — was it happy — were there any significant influences on you?

    My childhood was what is called “happy.” My parents were loving, kind, and intelligent; I had an extra mother in my great-aunt; I had three big brothers to tag around after (and to have fights with the youngest of them); and everybody in the family was glad I was a girl, which made me able to be glad to be a woman, eventually.

    My father was a university professor and we were well off, even during the Depression of the 1930’s. We lived in a beautiful redwood house in Berkeley, and summers on an old ranch in the hills of the Napa Valley. I went to public schools, where I got a good education (although I was shy and malingered a good deal in grade school, and high school was three years of social torture.)

    There were lots of visitors, lots of talk and argument and discussion about everything, lots of books around, lots of music and story-telling. The life of the mind can be a very lively one. I was brought up to think and to question and to enjoy.

    During the second World War my brothers all went into service and the summers in the Valley became lonely ones, just me and my parents in the old house. There was no TV then; we turned on the radio once a day to get the war news. Those summers of solitude and silence, a teenager wandering the hills on my own, no company, “nothing to do,” were very important to me. I think I started making my soul then.

    Poem For You – David Shapiro, Poet, Critic and an Art Historian

    January 2nd, 2018
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    Jan Palach – a Poem by David Shapiro, his collaboration with architect John Hejduk

  • Happy birthday David Shaprio

    Read Poem For You here.

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  • RIP William Gass (1924-2017), Rilke & Paul Valéry were His Guiding Lights

    December 17th, 2017
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    William Gaddis and William Gass photo by Mary Gass
    New Yorker – the Radical Criticism of William Gass

    William Gass, who died this week, argued that the charge of a writer was not to relate a world but to create one—a world of sound, of the melody made when syllables collid

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    William Gass being painted by Philip Guston before a reading in 1969. Photograph: Digital Gateway Image Collections
    Guardian on Gass

  • Four interviews of William Gass
    William Gass’ interview from Believer Magazine.
    “But I do have a very conscious desire not to be academic. I’m antiacademic. I hate jargon. I hate that sort of pretension. I am a person who [commits] breaches of decorum—not in private life, but in my work. They are part of my mode of operation. That kind of playfulness is part of my nature in general. The paradox that, in a way, to take something very seriously, you can’t always be serious about it..” (via 3quarksdaily).
    On Teaching and writing, interviewed by Jan Garden Castro.
    “Gass: I’m interested in making a self-contained system of concepts, ideas that will then define a kind of consciousness. It’s a way of inventing a consciousness by supplying someone with the structure and content of an experience. So I make that up and create that consciousness. It’s not a consciousness of the world; it’s a consciousness of the work.”
    On Wittgenstein,
    “The intellectual integrity he displayed was awesome, absolutely. I was watching not just a really great mind in operation but also an absolutely honest and pure intellect. I don’t think he was an honest and pure person, but he had that intellect, and you saw it. It was like seeing a great artist in operation—absolute scruple. No second-rate stuff would be permitted. That was really impressive. Again, it was an exemplification. Socrates embodies that way; I’m sure Spinoza must have. And Wittgenstein was the complete embodiment of that quest in himself.”

    From Gadfly an interview on William Gass in 1998 – “The Tunnel may well be the greatest prose performance since Nabokov’s Pale Fire, but only the most stalwart readers will be able to last the full trip through Kohler’s anti‑Semitic, sexually-depraved and bathroom‑humor obsessed world. ”

    “For instance, I can show in what way a sentence by Henry James “is” a spiral staircase. It has the same thought. And my mind works that way. (From Center for book culture – W.G interviewed by Arthur M. Saltzman)

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    William H. Gass, Allan Ginsberg, and Arthur Miller outside the apartment house of Fyodor Dostoevsky in St. Petersburg, Russia, 1985

    William H Gass (The Soul inside the sentence)

    Item (“The Surface of the City” Slide Photographs)

    Gass as Photographer

    Navy

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    Rilke and Paul Valéry

    Paul Valery’s influence on William Gass

    In William H. Gass’s “Art of Fiction” interview, in 1976, he declared two writers to be his guiding lights—the “two horses” he was now “try[ing] to manage”: Ranier Maria Rilke and Paul Valéry. He added, “Intellectually, Valéry is still the person I admire most among artists I admire most; but when it comes to the fashioning of my own work now, I am aiming at a Rilkean kind of celebrational object, thing, Dinge”

    His Final Performance, the Suicide of Yukio Mishima on Nov 25, 1970

    November 25th, 2017
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    Patriotism written, directed and acted by Yukio Mishima

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    Kishi Keiko on the left and Jean Cocteau on the right

  • John Nathan and Donald Richie on Yukio Mishima (Youtube)

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    Mishima – A Vision of the Void - by Marguerite Yourcenar.. (Photo of Mishima by Hosoe).
    Hijikata, Mishima, Hosoe, Tomatsu Donald Richie (see more photos here)

  • R.I.P Yukio Mishima Nov 25, 1970.

  • Going to school Yukio_Mishima_1931
    Japan Studies – Chozick

    But by age nine, Mishima abandoned transvestitism, noting that: ‘it was tacitly required that I act like a boy. The reluctant masquerade had begun’ (Confessions, 27)

    The Tragic Life and Death of Yukio Mishima

    Yukio Mishima had a darker side: tormented in his youth by a disturbed grandmother with aristocratic pretensions, shamed by his overbearing father into hiding his early work..

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    Paul Schrader directing Mishima, A Life in 4 Chapters, his sister in law acted as his interpreter with Japanese crew and actors.
    His brother Leonard knew Mishima.

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    Akutagawa Hiroshi, Mishima and Donald Keene
    (via)

  • The Center Will Not Hold – a Documentary of Joan Didion – 2017

    November 1st, 2017
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    Joan Didion Documentary shows the warmer side of a cool Icon

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    New Yorker –

  • The Center will not hold

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    Photo by Annie Leibovitz

  • Joan Didion wrote the White Album (previous post)

    “We tell ourselves stories in order to live” is the first sentence of this collection of essays written by Joan Didion.
    “The White Album” includes her essays on Doris Lessing and Georgia O’Keefe.
    “I WILL BE HER WITNESS.
    That would translate sere su testigo, and will not appear in your travelers’ phrasebook because it is not a useful phrase for the prudent traveler.’ Another beginning sentences from her novel “A Book of Common Prayer”.

    Having lost her loved ones and having won an award for the brave book
    Joan is still writing.

    Joan shares a birthday with other funny writers and personalities,
    Calvin Trillin, Margaret Cho and Hanif Kureishi.

    Joan is the wise seer with a fragile exterior and migraine headaches.

  • Paris Review interview

  • Joan Didian recommended Another Sky –

    Kazuo Ishiguro Wins the Nobel – The Writer of the Floating World

    October 5th, 2017
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    Andrew Garfield and Kazuo Ishiguro
    See an excerpt from Never Let Me Go (Previous post – scroll down)

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    Congratulations! Kazuo Ishiguro wins the Nobel Prize.

    The Inevitable sadness of Kazuo Ishiguro’s fiction from the Conversation.

    BBC

    The New Yorker (James Wood) Wood loves “Never Let Me Go” and his early novels – saying Ishiguro has supremely done
    his own kind of thing.

    LA times –

    “The author’s subtlety and coolness are fascinating,” wrote Patricia Highsmith
    Ishiguro attended British boarding schools and took time off, in 1973, to hitchhike across the U.S. with his guitar. He studied philosophy and literature at the University of Kent, when he sang and played in a band, and then got a master’s in creative writing at the University of East Anglia. Steeped in the idealistic social movements of the 1960s and ’70s, he worked for several years helping the homeless and on housing rights.

  • Paris Review interview

  • The Remains of the Day books
    Toyota brake pad talk show. (My old web art from Post Mutant Eggplant)

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    NYtimes

    Kazuo Ishiguro, a Nobel Winner Whose Characters Are Caught Between Worlds

    The Passing of Kate Millet – Artist, Author, a Pioneer Feminist at 82 -(Sept 14, 1934 – Sept 6, 2017)

    September 7th, 2017
  • Kate Millet by Alice Neel – 1970

    Kate Millet an influential feminist writer is dead at 82 (NYtimes)

    .

    Katherine Murray Millett was born on Sept 14, 1934, in St. Paul.
    She attended Oxford University and was the first American woman to be awarded a postgraduate degree with first-class honors after studying at St Hilda’s College, Oxford.
    The feminist, human rights, peace, civil rights, and anti-psychiatry movements were some of Millett’s principal causes. Her books were motivated by her activism, such as woman’s rights and mental health reform, and several were autobiographical memoirs that explored her sexuality, mental health, and relationships. Mother Millett and The Loony Bin Trip, for instance, dealt with family issues and the times when she was involuntarily committed to a nursing home. (via her wiki

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    Dinner for One – 1967 – Kate Millet

    See more art by Kate Millet here

  • “The Basement” was disturbing but I had to read it.
    Here is a review of the Basement by Duncan Mitchell

    Happy Kate katemillett by Hyder in 1994.

    Her homepage is here. – AN INVITATION TO THE WOMEN’S ART COLONY/FARM

    Of course she went to Iran.

    In 1981 Millett published Going to Iran, which was a new journalistic account of a trip she made to Iran in March 1979 to address Iranian feminists on International Women’s Day. The Shah of Iran had just abdicated, and the Ayatollah Khomeini had not yet fully consolidated his power. Nevertheless, Millett was soon expelled by the fundamentalist government for her feminist views. The chronicle is recorded in the rigorously honest style of her earlier works. (via)

  • Kate Millet

    The Return of the Troublemaker (June 2001)

    Society has lost its patience. So why isn’t she more downhearted? She smiles and says it’s because she is having too much fun. “I love making trouble. It’s a wonderful job. You don’t get paid but you have a lot of adventures.”

  • Flying with Kate Millet (previous post)
    Sexual Politics was circulated before the publication of her thesis.