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Noguchi Sculpture for White House Rose Garden

November 24th, 2020
  • Japanese American sculptor Isamu Noguchi’s piece, titled “Floor Frame,” is displayed in the White House Rose Garden on Saturday, Nov. 21, 2020, in Washington. Noguchi is the first Asian American artist to be featured in the White House collection, according to the first lady and the White House Historical Association. He died in 1988. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

    Noguchi Sculpture for the White House Rose Garden

    Art News

    Isamu Noguchi’s American Story: How a Small Sculpture Made a Big Impact at the White House

    Previous post (Isamu Noguchi, Yoshiko Yamaguchi, + tea ceremony with Charlie Chaplin etc)

    Happy Thanksgiving!

    Photographs by Masatoshi Nagase

    November 19th, 2020
  • Masatoshi Nagase Facebook

    Prevous post – Kiki and Masatoshi Nagase


  • (Photo of Matt Dillon by Masatoshi Nagase)


    (Photo of Hou Hsiao Hsien by Masatoshi Nagase)
    Previous post – Hou Hsiao Hsien


    (Christopher Dolye – photo by Masatoshi Nagase)

    The Last Life in the Universe – cinematography by Christopher Doyle.

  • RIP Soumitra Chatterjee, Actor, Playwright, Poet

    November 15th, 2020

    Soumitra Chatterjee: India acting legend dies, aged 85

    Soumitra Chatterjee (January 19, 1935 — November 15, 2020)
    (photo via)
    The third movie of the trilogy, Apur Sansar, which released in 1959, was also Chatterjee’s debut film. He would go on to star as the lead actor in 14 of Ray’s films.
    Pauline Kael called Chatterjee Ray’s “one-man stock company” who moved “so differently in the different roles he plays that he is almost unrecognisable”.

  • Chatterjee, who starred in more than 300 movies, was also an accomplished playwright, theatre actor and poet.

  • Chaterjee shone even in non-Satyajit Ray films

    Lesser Known facts about the living legend

    RIP Aldo Tambellini, Pioneered Electric Intermedia

    November 13th, 2020
  • Aldo TambelliniHe pioneered electronic intermedia, and is a painter, sculptor, and poet. He died at age 90, in 2020.

    Art news Obit

    Guardian Obit

    Aldo Tambellini, the pioneering artist and film-maker who had an obsession with the colour black, has died aged 90. He will be remembered among other things for developing what he termed “electromedia” – the bringing together of multiple forms including strobes, dance, film, poetry and slide projection. “We have lost a titan,” said Stuart Comer, a curator at MoMA in New York.

    Aldo Tambellini (born 29 April 1930) is an Italian American artist.

  • (R)evolution in Art & Physics: The All-Round Genius of Aldo Tambellini

  • We are the primitives of a new era -slideshow

    See more videos

    Beethoven, His Piano & “Beethoven’s Great Love” by Abel Gance –

    November 11th, 2020
  • Beethoven, who had met Nannette in Augsburg years earlier, asked to borrow one of her pianos for a 1796 concert in Pressburg (now Bratislava). Writing to Andreas, Beethoven joked that it was too “good” for him, because he wanted the “freedom to create his own tone.” In a follow-up letter, he complained that the piano was still the least developed of all the instruments and that it sounded too much like a harp.

    Nanette Streicher
    (wik)
    The Woman who built Beethoven’s Pianos

  • Beethoven’s Great Love (French title: Un grand amour de Beethoven, US title: The Life and Loves of Beethoven) is a 1937 French film directed by Abel Gance. It stars Harry Baur (as Ludwig van Beethoven), Annie Ducaux, Jany Holt, Jane Marken, Jean-Louis Barrault, and Marcel Dalio. Dalméras plays the part of Franz Schubert.
    Abel Gance – MUBI

    Windmill scene

    Death bed scene Beethoven Abel Gance.

  • 1abelganceL
    Photo of Gance by Latigue

    Abel Gance

    (25 October 1889 – 10 November 1981) was a French film director and producer, writer and actor. Pioneer in the theory and practice of montage, he is best known for three major silent films: J’accuse (1919), La Roue (1923), and the monumental Napoléon (1927).

    Previous post

    Pioneer of Electronic Sculpture, Alan Rath (1959–2020)

    November 3rd, 2020

  • Irrational Exuberance – Alan Rath (See more here)

  • FIRST31B-C-26OCT01-DD-PC Sculptor/artist Alan Rath has created a series of sculptures using computer components and video screens which blink and wink at viewers. PAUL CHINN/S.F. CHRONICLE

    Alan Rath, Bay Area Artist who pioneered electonic sculptures dies at 60

    With a degree in electrical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Rath cited a wide range of inspiration, including Alexander Calder, David Smith, Jimi Hendrix, NASA and Robert Moog, who designed analog synthesizers.

    In Memory of Alan Rath


  • (Alan Rath – First work)

  • Goodbye Sean Connery – from Mr. Universe to One Great Actor & Citizen

    October 31st, 2020

  • via

    Sad news from BBC
    Sean Connery passed away at 90.

  • Collaborations of Sean Connery and Sidney Lumet
    (Sean Connery made five films with director Sidney Lumet)

  • (With Audrey Hepburn, Robin and Marian directed by Richard Lester)

  • <> 1aJaffreyHuston
    The Man Who Would be King (John Huston)

  • The Name of the Rose, based on a novel by Umberto Eco.
    Further, Umberto Eco is an expert on the subject of 007, which adds him to the worldwide group of bondologs (“Bondologists,” Scandinavian expression for an expert in the field of James Bond).
    Time Magazine obit showing a photo of Sean Connery holding a “rose’ in his hand.

  • Sean Connery on Michael Crichton

    Connery says of Michael Crichton:
    He’s got a very big influence on my life….I’m interested more in writers and directors than I am in actors as a rule. I really have a terrific measure of affection for Michael here because I wasn’t joking out there when I say he can write bestsellers and take out your appendix. Because he reminds me so much of Umberto Eco in that he’s got all the elements that I adore. Terrific mind, good writer.
    Crichton shares some thoughts about Connery during the press conference:
    He’s had an enormous effect on my life. He’s one of the few people that I can remember things that he said in passing while we were walking down the street 25 years ago.

  • From Russia with Love, The Hunt for the Red October, and the Russia House find them in Sean Connery’s filmography here.

    Ana Lily Amirpour – Halloween 2020

    October 25th, 2020
  • <>

  • Ana Lily Amirpour Homemade Covid 19 short film Netflix

    Ana Lily Amirpour made a brilliant COVID-19 short for Netflix. It’s unlike anything she’s ever done

  • <>

    Happy Halloween!

    The Trial of the Chicago Seven – Sorkin’s Courtroom Drama

    October 18th, 2020

  • “There was more circus in that courtroom than I show in the movie. The scene where Sacha Baron Cohen [as Abbie Hoffman] and Jeremy Strong [as Jerry Rubin] enter the court wearing judges’ robes and then take them off with police shirts underneath — that really happened, but I decided to take it out of the movie, and it took Sacha and Jeremy lobbying me to put that back in. They persuaded me, and they were right.”

    Rememebering Abbie Hoffman
    (Allen Ginsberg Project)

  • Langella on Youtube

    Eddie on Youtube

    Mark Rylance – interview

    Was there anything about Kunstler in particular that impressed you?
    More frightened than anything. He’s so different than me. I was very impressed by him and his whole life really, and how these events changed him, and how he let go of the image of his life—of comfort and security—in a way that a lot of the other older people at the time couldn’t let go. He was so inspired by the eloquence and wisdom and passion of these young people that he went on to work for those poor prisoners in Attica and the American Indian movement when their issues came to the surface. He really spent his whole life after that defending those who might not be properly defended.

    I wish we had him around at the moment to unravel the knot of something like Guantanamo Bay; it’s so distressing to hear the people who were there without any justice. It’s an unresolved issue, for sure. But there are people around like Kunstler who are doing that work.

    What Happend to the real life major platyers

  • The Trial of the Chicago 7 Is a Riveting Movie. But the True Story Is Even More Dramatic
    Time Magazine True Stories

  • Passion of W.Eugene Smith – A Sublime Photojournalist

    October 12th, 2020
  • Amer. Army nurse 2nd Lieut. Florence Vehmeier walking past GI w. bullet wound in his stomach & rubber tube taped to his lip which drains his stomach through his nose to bucket on the floor in makeshift hospital in Cens Cathedral, during WWII.

  • WORLD WAR II. The Pacific Campaign. February 1945. The Battle of Iwo Jima (Japanese island). US Marine demolition team blasting out a cave on Hill 382.

  • Magnum Photos – W. Eugene Smith
    (Died: October 15, 1978, Tucson, AZ Smith was 59 years old.)


  • (Woman bathing her daughter, a victim of mercury poisoning, Minamata, Japan 1971)

    It has been called photojournalism’s Pieta. In 1971, Smith and his wife, photographer Aileen Mioko, moved to the
    Japanese village of Minamata for three years.
    Many regard this as the first photograph to awaken the world to ecological abuse. Page 525 – The Great Life Photographers.

  • Charlie CHAPLIN. 1952.
    Buster KEATON (left) and Charlie CHAPLIN (right) during the shooting of the movie “Limelight”, starring Charlie CHAPLIN, Sidney CHAPLIN, Claire BLOOM and Buster KEATON.

    See more photos of Charlie Chaplin’s Limelight set here.


  • (Nun Waiting for Survivors, Andrea Doria, 1956)

  • Minamata Homage to W. Eugene Smith
    (More photos here)

  • Honoring Harold Pinter by Mark Rylance, Also by Julian Sands & J. Malkovich

    October 10th, 2020
  • Nobel lecture performed by Mark Rylance – 2018

    Art, Truth and Politics: Harold Pinter’s legendary Nobel lecture performed by Mark Rylance
    By Robin Beste

    And how right he was.
    As well as in their professional lives, Mark Rylance and Harold Pinter were linked by their political activism, particularly in their opposition to injustice and war. Unsurprisingly, this led both to a close involvement with the Stop the War movement (STW), which was founded nearly two decades ago in response to the war in Afghanistan, and is one of the most significant mass movements in British history.

  • Harold Pinter quotes

    I think we communicate only too well, in our silence, in what is unsaid, and that what takes place is a continual evasion, desperate rearguard attempts to keep ourselves to ourselves. Communication is too alarming. To enter into someone else’s life is too frightening. To disclose to others the poverty within us is too fearsome a possibility.
    Harold Pinter

  • Julian Sands
    via
    Julian Sands, Harold Pinter the pregnant pause extended

    In his one-man show “A Celebration of Harold Pinter,” which he performs tonight at the Whittier College Writers Festival, the 55 year-old Brit reveals Pinter’s lesser known side—his surprising warmth and tenderness, as evidenced in his poetry, prose, letters, and the recollections and anecdotes of friends, including Sands himself. John Malkovich, with whom Sands previously worked in The Killing Fields, directs.

  • It is the dead of night,

    The long dead look out towards
    The new dead
    Walking towards them

    There is a soft heartbeat
    As the dead embrace
    Those who are long dead
    And those of the new dead
    Walking towards them

    They cry and they kiss
    As they meet again
    For the first and last time

    Harold Pinter, 2002
    (Born: October 10, 1930, Hackney, London, United Kingdom)

    Louise Glück awarded 2020 Nobel Prize in Literature

    October 8th, 2020

  • (via)

    Louis Gluck

    The American poet Louise Glück – awarded this year’s NobelPrize in Literature – was born 1943 in New York and lives in Cambridge, Massachusetts.
    Apart from her writing she is a professor of English at Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut.
    Glück seeks the universal, and in this she takes inspiration from myths and classical motifs, present in most of her works.
    The voices of Dido, Persephone and Eurydice – the abandoned, the punished, the betrayed – are masks for a self in transformation, as personal as it is universally valid.
    Louise Glück is not only engaged by the errancies and shifting conditions of life, she is also a poet of radical change and rebirth, where the leap forward is made from a deep sense of loss.
    In one of her most lauded collections, The Wild Iris (1992), for which she was awarded the Pulitzer Prize, she describes the miraculous return of life after winter in the poem “Snowdrops”:

    Louise Gluck Weebly com

    You will hear thunder and remember me

    October

    Louise Glück – 1943-

    Is it winter again, is it cold again,
    didn’t Frank just slip on the ice,
    didn’t he heal, weren’t the spring seeds planted

    didn’t the night end,
    didn’t the melting ice
    flood the narrow gutters

    wasn’t my body
    rescued, wasn’t it safe

    didn’t the scar form, invisible
    above the injury

    terror and cold,
    didn’t they just end, wasn’t the back garden
    harrowed and planted—

    I remember how the earth felt, red and dense,
    in stiff rows, weren’t the seeds planted,
    didn’t vines climb the south wall

    I can’t hear your voice
    for the wind’s cries, whistling over the bare ground

    I no longer care
    what sound it makes

    when was I silenced, when did it first seem
    pointless to describe that sound

    what it sounds like can’t change what it is—

    didn’t the night end, wasn’t the earth
    safe when it was planted

    didn’t we plant the seeds,
    weren’t we necessary to the earth,

    the vines, were they harvested?